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FAQ

Check our FAQ before adding questions.

Algorithm

Summary

When programming large page size NAND with a small page size data format, it may be required by the customer that factory bad block marker locations be written with non-FFh data. Several device manufacturers write non-FFh data to factory bad blocks during the manufacturing process at the factory. Hence the additional requirement to write non-FFh data to the block in any location is not necessary.

Details

Specifications that use large page NAND device with small page programming generally specify that device manufacturers must scratch or zero-out bad blocks from the factory to meet customer requirements.

BPWin and Nand Options can be used to determine if this is indeed necessary

 

Enable Capture Bad Blocks during Read & Compare under NAND options and read a device from the factory that has bad blocks (the bad blocks are listed in the BPWin output window). Convert the decimal bad block value into an actual address in the Buffer and check if it is 00h or non-FFh data? If so, then the concern from the customer is not relevant as the factory bad blocks are already non-FFh.
The NAND Flash Options Screen

 

 

Example:
Consider a device with bad block at block 456 (which is a decimal block address). The equivalent 8-bit Buffer address is 3AC8000h. 
The read result is shown below as being all 00h data at 3AC8000h.
The Buffer Editor

 


Do not confuse the bad block marker with an actual bad block. Remember as well that all locations in the part are just a portion of the memory array. 
Even though there is a defined bad block marker per the device specification customer application implementation may relocate that marker to another location in the block. If this relocation occurs then the bad block marker location is modified, and subsequent operations in BPWin will need the Bad Block Marker Offset under Nand Options to list the relocated bad block marker address. This relocated address is now used to perform the bad block check. 
If the new BBMarker Offset address is not specified, BPWin will use the default values under NAND options, resulting in the device failing for too many bad blocks.



The following list shows the changes made to the latest BPWin beta release software. The current executable beta file is now available on the BPM website for immediate download.

www.bpmmicro.com/software/

BPWin V5.30.0 Beta update "v5300beta0123.exe"
23rd January 2013

Device Changed Model(s) Changes Made & Reasons
Recommended
1) Intersil ZL6105ALAF 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
1) Algorithm is optimized for better yield.
Addition
1) AT24C04C-XHM AT24C04C-XUM 1410/84 1600 1610 
1700 1710 2600 
2610 2700M 2700 
2710M 2710
1) Added support of this device in the SSOP8 package.
2) Atmel ATXMEGA64D3-AU 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
2) Added support of this device in the TQFP64 package.
3) Intersil ZL9117MIRZ 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
3) Added support of this device in the QFN21 package.
4) MX66L51235FZ2I-12G 2800F 2800F-MK2
2800
4) Added support of this device in the WSON8 package.
5) Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP-IT:E 
Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP-IT:E
2800F 2800F-MK2
2800
5) Support is released for Custom 18 (Skip_with_BBT_ECC) Bad Block Management Scheme under Device > NAND Options.
6) Samsung KMAKG0000M-B998 2800F-MK2
2800
6) Added support of this device in the BGA169 package for 2800F Flashstream programmer.,
7) STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T6A STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T6 STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T7A STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T7 STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T 2800 7) Added support of this device in the QFP48 package.
8) STMicroelectronics STM32F103ZFH6TR STMicroelectronics STM32F103ZFH7TR 2800 8) Added support of this device in the BGA144 package.
9) Intersil ZL9101MIRZ 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
9) Added support of this device in the QFP21 package.
Device Changed BPWin Version Date Reason
NEC uPD70F3425GJ(A)-GAE-QS-AX 5.30.0 16/01/2013 Updated codes to resolve over current error.
Micron N2M400FDB311A3CE
Micron N2M400FDB311A3CF
5.29.0 27/12/2012 Algorithm is updated to add Extended_CSD programming programming under Device > Configure.
Infineon(Siemens) SAF-XC836MT-2FRA
Infineon(Siemens) SAK-XC836MT-2FRA
5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to add Boot Mode index options under Device > Config.
NXP PCF7953ATT 5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to add secure

Atmel ATXMEGA32A4-MH 
Atmel ATXMEGA16D4-MH
5.29.0 11/16/2012 Secure command is Enabled. Fusebytes and Lockbits Registers are programmed with the Device > Secure option.

Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B
Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T
5.29.0 11/08/2012 Algorithm is updated to add correct device names: [Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B, Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T]. Removed incorrect device names: [Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B, Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T].
Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP:E 5.29.0 11/15/2012 Support is added for internal ECC under Device Config.

Texas Instruments TPS40422RHAR
Texas Instruments TPS40422RHAT
5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to resolve yield issue for certain devices. Added stand alone Verify operation.
Infineon(Siemens) SAF-XC836MT-2FRA
Infineon(Siemens) SAK-XC836MT-2FRA
5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to add Boot Mode index options under Device > Config.
NXP PCF7953ATT 5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to add secure

Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2ACDTE
Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2AVDTE
Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2AMDTE
Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2ACDT
Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2AVDT
Freescale Semiconductor MC68HC908QY2AMDT

Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2ACDT 
Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2AVDT 
Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2AMDT 
Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2ACDTE 
Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2AVDTE 
Freescale Semiconductor MC908QY2AMDTE 

Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1CDT
Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1VDT
Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1MDT

Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1CDTE
Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1VDTE
Freescale Semiconductor S908QY2AD1MDTE

5.28.0 10/31/2012 Algorithm is updated to set a default value for Device-Configure. The default Address to write oscillator Calibration is $FFC0.

Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B
Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T
5.29.0 11/08/2012 Algorithm is updated to add correct device names: [Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B, Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T]. Removed incorrect device names: [Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-B, Atmel AT25160B-SSHL-T].

Texas Instruments TPS40422RHAR
Texas Instruments TPS40422RHAT
5.29.0 11/07/2012 Algorithm is updated to resolve yield issue for certain devices. Added stand alone Verify operation.

API

Question

How can I use BPWin API to read back the insert count of the installed socket modules?

Answer

BPWin API does provide insertion counts via "The SystemInformation XML document", which can be retrieved using the "GetSystemInfo" method as well as the "NotifyConfigurationUpdate" event, both of CJobMonitor.  

GetSysInfo

There is no current way to retrieve daughter card serial numbers, but a feature request for that functionality has been added.

BPM Returns

In an effort to be as flexible and efficient as possible in the way that we handle all requests for support, we have created our new online helpdesk to provide both our staff and customers a central resource.

No more trawling through emails to check the latest status of on an issue, or creating your own lists to try and help keep track, simply use our helpdesk to manage all requests and save some time.

 

  
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Online

Via the Adaptsys Helpdesk, select the relevant department and submit a ticket.

You do not need to have an account or be signed in to submit a ticket, although signing in first is highly recommended as it will save you time and ensure that the request is correctly linked with your account..
The advantage of this method is that we use dynamic forms that are loaded based on the enquiry type, these are used to collect all the relevant information for your support request.

Once stored online, you and your colleagues can access the requests to share the workload.
Additionally, logs are created for each request to save time and date information regarding who responded, status changes and who were notified.  Any attachments are also stored too.

 

email-icon
Email

You can send an email to us at support@adaptsys.com with details of the support request, making sure you include all relevant information such as equipment make and models and software versions.

Our staff will assess the request and log this on the helpdesk.  
If you have an account already, then it will be associated with your account and you will get a notification that it has been created.
If you do not have an account, we will create one for you, associate the request with your account and mail your login details to you.

All helpdesk notifications you receive will include a "Reply below/above line" text area. Simply add a response between these tags and the response will be added to the online request.

 

telephone-icon
Call

You are always welcome to call your local office and discuss any issues that you may have.

  • UK Customers: +44 (0) 1730 262444
  • French Customers: +33 (0) 143 97 80 30
  • German Customers: +49 (0)163 6287570
  • Hungarian Customers: +36 30 419 2630

Your request will be logged in the same way as mentioned above to allow a record to be kept and to follow through to a conclusion.

 

 

We always recommend that support is done through our Helpdesk online.

BPWin

As default, BPWin sets a 1024MB log file directory limit and a 10MB per log file limit, but it is possible to change these values if you wish.
 
To do this, keys must be changed in Windows Registry.
Please take care when editing the registry as it can cause Windows or BPWin to become unstable or unusable if the wrong settings are changed.
The registry can be exported prior to making any changes, simply by highlighting the Computer icon in the left pane, then selecting Export, via the File menu item.
 
If in doubt, consult your IT department or contact you local Adaptsys support engineer for further assistance.
 
 
Once you have backed upregistry editor is open, the key location varies depending on 32bit or 64 bit OS.
For 32 bit: Expand, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, then BP Microsystems, then click on the BPWin folder.
in the right panel, you should see LogDirectoryLimitMB and LogFileLimitMB.
 
For 64 bit: Expand, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, then Wow6432Node, then BP Microsystems and then click on the BPWin folder, the same as for 32 bit.
 
The first key sets the maximum file size for the directory, whilst the other sets the limit for the actual log file.
 
Once changes have been made, you can close Windows Registry Editor.
Changes should be immediate, but in some cases BPWin should be closed and restarted for them to take effect.

 

BPM have recently added new features in BPWin, starting from 5.40, to support the new 3800MK2 that uses both upward and downward vision.

When installing new versions of software, it appears that as default, BPWin enables a new hardware function check that does not exist on other handlers.

The Problem

Are you seeing the following error message?

vision-component-fail

 

The Solution

To rectify the problem, close BPWin, then open the registry editor and navigate to:

32BIT: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SOFTWARE>BPM Microsystems>BPWin>AutoHandler>Components

64BIT: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SOFTWARE>Wow6432Node>BPM Microsystems>BPWin>AutoHandler>Components

In the right window you will see UseUpwardDownwardVisionComponentsCheck the DWORD.
The following screenshot shows the DEFAULT value after I installed 5.44.1.


UseUpwardDownwardVision
If it is set to 1, change it to 0 then close registry editor and start BPWin which will now initialise correctly.

This key is used to enable/disable the upward camera, so if it is set to 1 BPWin is expecting to communicate with it.  This should be set to 0 for all 4x/3x types unless it has an upward camera.

 

Summary

To provide customers with general definition of file formats that BPMicrosystems currently support

 

Details

Below, you will find a few links for reference.

Please note that many of these file formats are rarely used for programming these days and more or becoming obsolete, so specifications for every file format supported is not possible.

Also note that some of the supported file formats date back to 1985 under BPDos support so even paper specifications are no longer available.

 

 

BINARY http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_file

INTEL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_HEX

Intelhexspec.pdf

JEDEC http://www.jedec.org/Home/manuals/jm19-03.PDF

jesd3c[1].pdf

MOTOROLA http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S-record

POF http://www.altera.com/literature/hb/cfg/cfg_cf52007.pdf

STRAIGHT Is a hexadecimal file with no addressing Also known as Raw Hex. Could not locate authoritative spec 

TEKHEX http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tektronix_extended_HEX

ASCIIHEX Could not locate an authoritative spec 

SDSMAX Could not locate an authoritative spec

SDSMAC320 Could not locate an authoritative spec

FAIRBUG Could not locate an authoritative spec

FORMATBIN For Actel, previously, the accepted file format was known as DIO format. Customers who are programming devices that have been in production prior to 1999 will likely have data compiled in DIO format. BP Microsystems software supports both formats(afm.dio), and loads the DIO file as FORMATBIN.

OMF http://download.intel.com/design/intarch/papers/esc_file.pdf

AFM This information is proprietary you may be able to contact Actel for more information

PROASIC This information is proprietary you may be able to contact Actel for more information

STAPL http://www.actel.com/documents/ISP_STAPL_AN.pdf

IEEE1532DATA http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/1532/index.html

 

 

As a convenience, please refer to the link below, which provides multiple definitions/specifications of different file formats:

 

http://srecord.sourceforge.net/srecord-1.64.pdf

As standard, BPWin provides two levels of user access, Operator and Supervisor.

The permissions for these user based roles can be customised, for example, to restrict operators from erasing devices or other such functions.

Open the Job Master Configuration and look for Enable Job Protection option.

jobmaster configuration

This option is only available when the Data Pattern is stored in the JobMaster file and if the size the data file is less than 1 GB as the data file must be saved within the Job file for the option to be available.  If the data file is > 1 GB, the "Store Data Pattern in JobMaster File" and associated options will be grayed out due to file size restrictions imposed by Windows.

The Enable Job Protection allows the job creator to restrict access to the Data Pattern and other programming parameters, as well as deny access to certain device operations.   The job creator specifies a "Job Lock" password that can be used to unlock the job and restore full functionality.

Usage Details:

  • When this option is enabled, Data Pattern access will be restricted (no access to the Data Pattern editor).  The "Job Permissions" button can be used to configure which additional device operations should be restricted.
  • When Job Protection is in use, the job creator will be prompted for the job lock password when saving the job. This password is case-sensitive and not recoverable if lost.  If no password is specified (blank password) the job will not be locked.
  • When the protected job is loaded, all restricted functions will be disabled.
  • To restore full control, the user must unlock the job by selecting JobMaster->Unlock Protected Job...  and specify the job lock password for that job. If the password matches the one saved in the job, the job is unlocked.
  • Note that the job can only be unlocked in the current session. Loading the original file will still result in a restricted access. To permanently disable the job lock on a particular job, the job should be saved with the "Job Protection" feature disabled or with a blank password.
  • If a user saves a locked job while it is still locked, he/she will not be prompted for a password. Instead the same password used to lock the job will be used. This allows the user to load a locked job, modify the serialization parameters for instance, then re-save the locked job within gaining access to any restricted functionality. 

The following screen shot shows an example job file opened in operator mode (with a programmer connected/detected by BPWin), only the button is operational for the operator.

job settings restricted

 

 

If further access control to BPWin is required, then Windows Account Based Security could be a better solution.

 

Device Package Dimensions

The CyberOptics laser alignment camera is the heart of the vision centering system and you will need to specify the dimensions of your device. A library of package types comes with the BPWin software. The settings for a package can be edited. The dimensions of the device are stored under a package type name for future jobs. 

Using Auto Measure 

If the interlock(s) are opened during the auto measure process, the process will be aborted to avoid discrepancies when measuring the component. The following illustrates using the auto measure utility on a BP-4000 series Autohandler to measure a TSOP48 package.

  1. Open the Select Location to Teach dialog and select the package.
  2. Click the Teach button to display the package type dialog.
  3. Click on the Auto Measure button to start the utility. You will be presented with the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog to help assist in learning the location of the device. Use the arrows to position the nozzle as close to the center of the device then click the OK button to auto-learn the location of the device.
  4. After the location has been taught, you will be presented with a Package Auto Measure Utility dialog. The stages after teaching the device location can be lengthy depending on the thickness of the device. An Abort button is provided to allow you to terminate the entire process and place the device back in its original orientation.
  5. After the process is completed the package settings will have been updated. You will see a completion notification dialog.
  6. Click the OK button to complete the process and review the changes in the package type dialog put in by the utility.
Note:  If the longest length is within 1% of the narrowest length, then the utility will consider the package to be square and will set both lengths equal to the narrowest length.

More information about this feature can be found in the Automated Package Measure Utility FAQ.

 

Manually Editing 

The contents in the Select Location to Teach dialog are imported from what was entered in the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog.

  1. Select the package type (ex: TSOP32) you specified on the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog and click on the Teach button. The package type dialog appears on the screen.
  2. Populate the following the fields in the Device Package Dimensions section according to the manufacturer's data or specification sheets:
    1. Device thickness, including any leads - enter the thickness of the device with the inclusion of any leads. Cyberoptic laser align sensor requires this information to align the device properly.
    2. Device narrowest length, including any leads - enter the narrowest length of the device with the inclusion of any leads.
    3. Device longest length, including any leads - enter the longest length of the device with the inclusion of any leads.
    4. Equal Lengths - select the checkbox to designate if the narrowest and longest lengths should be equal.

Pin Numbering Style

Choose how pin 1 is determined on the package. The style selected here will show how pin 1 is oriented on the package in the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog when an input or output location is selected for teaching.

  • SOIC, TSOP, µBGA - Select this option to represent an SOIC, TSOP, or uBGA package style. This type of package style will display the pin one location at a corner of the package in the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog and it will also display the "'reverse" pin one location in the same dialog.
  • PLCC (centered pin 1) - Select this option to represent a PLCC package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a center of the package.
  • QFP (corner pin 1) - Select this option to represent a QFP package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a corner of the package.
  • DIP - Select this option to represent a DIP package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a corner of the package. If this package's diagonal maxima exceeds 1055 mils (2.6797 mm) and vision centering is enabled then a warning message to disable vision centering, as illustrated in Figure A, will be presented when the OK button is selected.

VSP Nozzle Obstruction Detection

Note:  This section is available only on 4000-series APSs when the package dimensions meet the criteria for Very Small Package (VSP).

By measuring the change in vacuum to detect an obstruction the PnP can know when to begin raising the nozzle with the device attached when performing a pick operation. On the smallest devices pick errors may occur because this change is smaller than with larger devices. To account for this you can adjust the value used to determine when the nozzle has been obstructed. You should only adjust this value if you notice an unusual number of pick errors with VSP devices during a job session.

 

To adjust this value, follow these steps:

  1. Ensure the nozzle is currently unobstructed with no device attached.
  2. Click the "Vacuum" button. This will turn on the vacuum and enable the adjustment slider and the obstruction indicator.
  3. Place a device on the nozzle.  Obstruction detection is indicated below the slider.
  4. Using the slider, adjust the value as appropriate. Decreasing the adjustment percentage will cause the system to use a value that's closer to the unobstructed value while increasing the percentage will use a value that is further.
Note: The variation in vacuum pressure may cause the system to read values that never change the behavior of the obstruction indicator. The indicator is present only as a guideline and ultimately the adjustment value should be determined based on the performance of pick operations during a job session.

The adjustment percentage value is saved along with all other package parameters for future jobs.

BPM Microsystems has investigated what impact lead free devices would have on the programming process.
The main focus of the investigation was to see if lead free leads would have a negative effect on the electrical contact between the device leads and the socket.
Initially the leading socket vendors reported that lead-free leads would not have a negative effect on the quality of the electrical contact made, however, while working with both the semiconductor manufacturer and socket vendors in more depth, BPM Microsystems found that some lead free devices may require a different socket due to potential electrical and mechanical contact issues.

What this means is that a new socket module may need to be designed for a lead free device to improve the contact.
The actual process of device programming is not affected by lead free devices, just the physical, electrical continuity and socket life. 

Any devices in production should now be available in a lead free package, which BPM Microsystems will have a solution.

Legacy, non-lead free devices will need to be considered separately on a case by case basis.

If you have any further questions on lead free device support and sockets, then please contact us.

When there is a requirement to program a device, you will need to know which socket module is required to interface the device to the programmer.

This can be found out within BPWin using the following steps.

  1. Run BPWin (You do not need to have a programmer attached to the PC to do this)
  2. Follow the onscreen prompts during software loading.
  3. Once BPWin has loaded, click on the Device button
    bpwin-device-select
  4. Enter the device number in the Look For field or scroll through the list to find the one you want.socket-module-select
  5. Once you have found your device, click on it to highlight it, the press the Socket Module Information button, as seen above.  A new pop up will appear.modules
  6. This now displays all the modules that can be used for the device, hopefully you already have one.
    If you do not have any suitable modules, then please Contact Us and we will be able to provide a quotation.
    When contacting us, please specify the Device Type, Programmer model you have, Socket Module Type required, Quantity of modules required and any other relevant information

The BPWin program also uses keystroke combinations, called hot keys or quick keys. Listed below are common keys and keystroke combinations.

To select a field or menu item, use the keystroke combination <ALT> + <underlined character> in the active window wherever applicable.

 

COMMON USAGE KEYS*

Key

Function

Esc

Closes the current window/retain original information.

Left Arrow or Right Arrow

Moves left or right for a selection.

Up Arrow or Down Arrow

Moves up or down for a selection.

Enter

Executes function command.

*These keys can be used at any time.

 

HOT KEYS IN BPWIN MAIN

Key

Function

Alt + B

Selects the Blank device command tab.

Alt + C

Selects the Secure device command tab.

Alt + D

Opens the Device drop-down menu.

Alt + E

Selects the Erase device command tab.

Alt + F

Opens the File drop-down menu.

Alt + G

Opens the Device Config dialog.

Alt + H

Opens the Help drop-down menu.

Alt + I

Opens the Device Selection dialog.

Alt + J

Opens the JobMaster drop-down menu.

Alt + K

Selects the Banks drop-down combo-box when "Sets" mode is enabled, and the programming mode is Single.  

Alt + L

Selects the Special Operations device command tab.

Alt + M

Selects the Compare device command tab.

Alt + N

Opens the Data Pattern dialog.

Alt + O

Selects the Position drop-down combo-box when "Sets" mode is enabled, and the programming mode is Single.

Alt + P

Selects the Program device command tab.

Alt + Q

Selects the Quantity field.

Alt + R

Selects the Read device command tab.

Alt + S

Selects the Secure device command tab.

Alt + T

Opens the Tools drop-down menu.

Alt + U

Opens the Autohandler drop-down menu.

Alt + V

Selects the Verify device command tab.

Ctrl + A

Rename\save a copy of the JobMaster file.

Ctrl + D

Opens the Select Device dialog.

Ctrl + E

Opens the Buffer Editor dialog.

Ctrl + L

Load a JobMaster file.

Ctrl + N

Opens the Configure dialog.

Ctrl + O

Opens the Open dialog to select a data pattern.

Ctrl + S

Save current settings to a JobMaster file.

F1

Opens the BPWin Help user's guide.

 

DIALOG BOX COMMAND FUNCTIONS*

Key

Function

Enter

Execute the button with the focus. In BPWin Main, start (execute) the selected device operation\job.

Esc

Cancel and close the active dialog. In BPWin Main, stop (abort) the current device operation\job.

Tab

Move to next field.

*Dialog boxes gather information before executing commands.

 

 

TEXT EDIT COMMAND FUNCTIONS

Key

Function

Left, Right, Up or DownArrow

Moves cursor.

Home

Moves cursor to front of current line.

End

Moves cursor to end of current line.

The control software (BPWin) for your programmer is updated on a frequent basis, typically every six weeks, to provide you with support for new chips.

Software updates may be obtained from BPM Microsystems website.

Software upgrades and Software Support may be obtained via BPM Microsystems website, but depending on the type of programmer you have (engineer, production, or automated), upgrades, and renewals may need to be obtained by contacting your local sales office.

If you decline the software/hardware upgrade and your software support runs out, you will receive the following an error message (Error Code 57) when selecting a part. 

Your programmer is designed to be highly flexible and programmable, allowing it to program a wide variety of chips. Consequently, when a problem does arise, it can usually be fixed with a software update. 

We recommend that you use the latest software revision before contacting our support with a software problem. 

BPWin includes a variety of error messages to help debug problems with the software and hardware, the following table lists these error message to aid in fault finding.

Programming Errors

Error 3: Cannot reset hardware.

The software cannot establish communications with the programmer. Here are some suggestions:

  • Be sure the programmer has proper power and that the green PASS LED is on. Since the programmer will do an automatic Power On Self Test (POST) upon start-up, it could be that the programmer failed the test and has signalled the software into the default DEMO mode. If this should happen, please contact Support .

  • The programmer may be damaged. Try another computer and/or USB port and see if it works there. See Calling for Technical Support .

Error 5: Hardware time-out.

This error message is generated when the software is waiting on a response from the programmer while executing a command and the programmer does not respond within the expected amount of time. This error may result from several causes. You may be experiencing communication errors (see Error 3: Cannot reset hardware above). There may be a bug in the software for this particular algorithm (see Error 10: Error in programming algorithm below). See also the Self-Test section.

Error 6: Wrong model number.

See Error 3: Cannot reset hardware above for possible causes.

Error 9: Programmer execution error.

The programmer failed an internal consistency check. See Error 3: Cannot reset hardware and Error 5: Hardware time-out for possible causes.

Error 10: Error in programming algorithm. Please call technical support.

The software has detected an internal error. You should contact BPM Microsystems to report the error. You may need to obtain a software update. See the Calling for Technical Support section.

Error 11: There is no data in the buffer. You must load a file or read a chip.

A command tried to read data from the buffer to program or verify a chip, but nothing has been loaded into the buffer yet or the buffer was recently cleared.

Error 14: There is no chip in the programmer site.

Be certain that your chip is inserted correctly. If the chip was inserted correctly, remove it and run the hardware self-test to be sure your programmer is functioning correctly (Programmer Diagnostics). A defective chip may cause this error. When using an autohandler, the socket may not have closed or a connection between the programmer and the socket may be disconnected.

Error 15: The chip is not inserted in the programmer site correctly.

The continuity test determined that the chip in the programmer site does not have continuity on all the proper pins. You should examine these pins carefully. Possible causes are:

  • A bent pin.

  • The chip is not in the proper position in the programmer site.

  • The chip has a different number of pins than the chip selected.

  • The algorithm selected has an * (asterisk), indicating it requires an adapter, but you did not use the adapter, or vice-versa.

  • The socket is dirty and not making a connection.

  • The wrong socket module or adapter is being used for this part.

  • The device may be a very low power device that is not properly detected by our continuity methodology. If so, please let us know.

Note:  

  • It is not easy to get continuity on an LCC device in a PLCC socket. If you are trying to do that, then you may need to add a spacer between the chip and the lid in order to apply the proper force to the device pins. The best solution is to purchase an LCC socket module that does not require any such jury rigging.

  • LCC devices will not work in the auto-eject sockets designed strictly for PLCC devices.

Error 16: The chip is inserted backwards.

The chip has passed the continuity tests, but appears to have the GND and Vcc pins improperly placed in the socket. If the DIP, SOIC, or TSOP device is not actually inserted backwards and the LCC, PLCC, or QFP is not accidentally rotated, then the device is probably defective. Try a known good device.

Error 18: Temporary file error.

Our software’s virtual memory manager is trying to store data that is currently not needed in RAM to the disk. The program was unable to create a temporary file or the disk is full. You should make sure you have plenty of disk space (the larger the data files, the larger the requirement for temporary disk space). The program does take advantage of EMS memory if you have an expanded memory manager installed. This is much faster than using the disk for temporary swap space.

Error 21: Cannot program.

Not able to program the device in the programmer site. See the Errors While Programming tab.

Error 22: Cannot erase.

Not able to erase the device in the programmer site. See the Errors While Programming tab.

Error 23: Invalid electronic signature in chip (device ID).

The chip may be damaged or the chip manufacturer may have changed the programming algorithm without notifying us. See Error 25: Invalid electronic signature in chip (manufacturer ID) below.

Error 24: Invalid electronic signature in chip (algorithm ID).

The chip may be damaged or the chip manufacturer may have changed the programming algorithm without notifying us. See Error 25: Invalid electronic signature in chip (manufacturer ID) below.

Error 25: Invalid electronic signature in chip (manufacturer ID).

Many of the new EEPROM based PLDs (such as all the GALs) have electronic identifiers that specify the manufacturer, the device code, and the proper programming parameters. The most common cause of this error is if you have selected the wrong manufacturer for the particular part you are using (for example, you may have a National Semiconductor part in the programmer site and a Lattice part selected). It is also possible that your chip has a newer ID than your software revision supports.

Error 26: Device is not blank.

A blank check may have been performed via the Blank or Program command. The device in the programmer site is determined to have programmed data.  Possible causes are:

  • The part needs to be erased longer.

  • The device was previously programmed and cannot be erased (OTP EPROMs and fuse-link PLDs).

  • The wrong algorithm was used.

Error 27: Device is not secured.

An attempt to secure a device was made, but it failed. See Errors while Programming section.  

Error 28: Data in chip does not match buffer.

A verify operation was performed to see if the chip and the buffer have the same data, but there is a difference in the two patterns. The verify may have been performed via the Verify or Program command. The verify will not show where the difference occurred but the Compare command will show you all the discrepancies. Here are some reasons why a device may fail to verify:

  • The part was secured.

  • The part was programmed with a different pattern.

  • The part has not yet been programmed.

  • The device was incorrectly programmed by a different system.

  • The wrong algorithm is selected.

  • The chip was not properly erased before programming (this would be caught by the blank check if it was enabled).

  • The wrong adapter is being used.

  • The device is not inserted correctly and you have the continuity test turned off or you ignored its error messages.

  • The device is defective.

Error 31: Database file is invalid. The .EXE file is corrupted.

The .EXE file you are executing has been corrupted. You should get a new copy from BPM Microsystems. 

Error 32: Sorry, algorithm not found. Please call technical support.

The .EXE file you are executing has been corrupted. You should get a new copy from BPM Microsystems.

Error 33: You must re-select the chip you want to program.

The device was selected before establishing communications with the programmers, perhaps prior to turning on the programmer or before switching to a different programmer. Simply re-select the chip and the error should not reoccur.

Error 36: You must properly install the correct socket module.

The software interrogates the socket module before each operation to determine the correct mapping for the algorithm selected. You will get this error if:

  • There is no socket module installed.

  • The socket module installed does not support the device you have selected (for example, you have selected a 20 pin device and you have a 28 pin PLCC socket module attached).

  • The socket module installed is not supported by the version of the software you are using.

  • Use the latest version.

  • The pinout has not yet been defined for this package type. 

Error 39: Device already secured.

The device cannot be legitimately programmed, read, etc., because it has been secured. If it is a PLD it may still be functionally tested using the Test command.

Error 40: No test vectors present.

The file you loaded did not contain any test vectors. Therefore, the Test command will not be executed.

Error 44: Internal error. Please call technical support.

The software detected an internal inconsistency. This may be caused by the computer not performing correctly.

Error 46: AFS software required to execute this function.

This is a function that is available to users that have purchased the Advanced Feature Software only. In order to use the chosen function you must buy the AFS upgrade. 

Error 47: Self-test failed. This unit may need service. Please call technical support.

The self-test (Programmer Diagnostics) has detected a hardware problem. If this should happen, double-check the fidelity of the cable connections and try again. If you are still having trouble, please contact Support.

 

This error can occur when performing Programmer Diagnostics during the calibration verification procedure and answering NO to the question "Is the socket module installed?" regarding the requirement of having a SM48D/SM48DB installed before continuing.

Error 48: Cannot Unprotect.

An attempt was made to unprotect a sector and failed. See Errors while Programming.

Error 49: Cannot Protect.

An attempt was made to protect a sector and failed. See Errors while Programming.

Error 57: You must purchase support for this device to use it.

The device that you selected is not supported in the default device set for this programmer. 

Error 70: The buffer data cannot be used to program this device.

 

You loaded a file type that is not a valid option for the currently selected device. Re-select the device and load the buffer again. 

 

If you use BPWin V5.24 and above and have issue running your laser then check the attachmemt

Teaching the label presenter location is more of a challenge in comparison to teaching other pick and place locations as it requires that the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis to be manually taught.  

Typically, a label would be too thin to be measured with the CyberOptics vision centering system, so you will have to manually locate the center of the label using the laser pointer on a 3000 series autohandler or the downward vision camera on a 4000 series autohandler.

It is important to understand that the accuracy of the Z-axis teach location will affect the performance of the pick operation on the label.  With a normal part, if the Z-axis teach location is a little high then the Pick-and-Place nozzle can still suck the part up when the vacuum is on, however, if the Z-axis teach is a little high for the labels, it will fail to pick the label as the label will have downward resistance due to the adhesive bond with the backing tape.

Conversely if the Z-axis teach location is too low, then the Pick-and-Place nozzle will overdrive the label causing the label to be compressed on to the backing making it increasingly difficult to remove and again result in a pick failure.

It is preferable to manually teach the Z-axis location using the Z-axis control described in manually teach the Z-axis position.  This will allow you to precisely position the Pick-and-Place nozzle on top of the label and then record the position as the learned Z-axis location.

Note:  Using the Auto Learn Z-axis feature to learn the Z-axis location will learn the location too high and introduce pick failures when picking a label.  This is because labels are prone to be "lifted" by the vacuum of the Pick-and-Place nozzle. 

  1. Make the appropriate entries in the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog to teach.
  2. Select Autohandler > Teach... from the pull-down menu. The Select Location to Teach dialog appears on the screen.
  3. Select the LABELPRESENTER name.
  4. Click the Teach button.
  5. Select the Pin 1 radio button from Figure A or B to designate the orientation of pin 1 on the label to properly orient the label to the device.
    Orienting the Label using Label Presenter provides more information on determining the selection.
  6. Use the directional arrow buttons to position the Pick-and-Place nozzle over the center of the label.
  7. Teach the Z-axis location using the Z-axis control described in To manually teach the Z-axis position.
  8. Click OK.
Note:  Marking a center point on the label to teach will aid in label placement accuracy.

 

Label Thickness

When a label is attached to the device, the device becomes slightly thicker.  This can cause alignment problems with the Laser Align Camera.  Entering the label thickness will allow the software to adjust the alignment offset.

 

label-teach

 

Label Orientation

This section provides helpful information in setting up the Label Presenter settings for proper label orientation on the device.

The key to correctly orienting the label is to remember that BPWin will match the pin 1 designation on the label to the pin 1 designation of the site. Whatever edge or corner of the label to be placed near pin 1 is the radio button to be selected.

Examples:

The examples provided below show what radio button to select for different label placements. The orientation of the devices and labels pictured below is how it would appear standing at the front of the handler. Screenshots are from the Nozzle Adjust Position: LABELPRESENTER dialog. These examples can be adapted to your unique set-up. 

TSOP and Label A

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device, click on the lower or upper left radio button in Fig. B. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tsop label a-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device, click on the lower or upper right radio button in Fig. B. The label will not be turned.

tsop label a-3

 

TSOP and Label B

To place the "L" nearest pin 1, click on the lower or upper right radio button in Fig. B. The label will not be turned.

tsop label b-l

To place the "3" nearest pin 1, click on the lower or upper left radio button in Fig. B. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tsop label b-3

 

TSOP and Label C

To place the "L" nearest pin 1, click on the upper left or right radio button in Fig. A. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tsop label c-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1, click on the lower left or right radio button in Fig. A. The label will be turned -90 degrees.

tsop label c-3

 

TQFP and Label A

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the upper left radio button. The label will not be turned.

tqfp label a-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the lower right radio button. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tqfp label a-3

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with vertical placement, click on the lower left radio button. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tqfp label a-lv

 

TQFP and Label C

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with vertical placement, click on the upper left radio button. The label will not be turned.

tqfp label c-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the lower left radio button. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tqfp label c-3

 

locations

 

 

 

The Y-axis is the short, front/back axis. Also called the lower axis. (Note: For old DOS systems, this would be the "X" axis) 

The time-out error message is received because the Y motor drive system did not get to the commanded encoder position within a certain time period.  This is usually caused by excessive slop in the Y drive system. Imagine that the Y-axis was commanded to go to Y encoder position 35803. The axis moves there, but overshoots a little. The motor reverses direction and moves, but again overshoots, the motor reverses again, moves, doesn't get there, moves again and then over shoots. Finally, the motion time period expires, the encoder is not at the desired location, so the error is displayed.  You can imagine that if the Y belt was loose, and the Y motor turns a fraction of 1 degree, all this does is take up slack, and the encoder never changes position. The solution is to find the source of the slack/slop and correct it.

 

  1. The first item to check is the belt. Unfortunately, there is no measurement tool to determine proper belt tension. Common sense should dictate the tension, but as a simple test, pinch the belt in the middle, and using moderated force, push and pull on the belt and the movement should be no more than about 1 inch. The Y idler assembly is at the front of the belt, and the motor is at the back. Two screws will loosen the Y idler assembly. (Note: the bottom screw acts as the hinge, and the upper screw is in a slot for adjustment.) Use a large, flat screwdriver as a lever on the Y idler body to achieve belt tension. When the tension is sufficient, tighten the 2 screws to secure the Idler assembly in position. Note: If the belt is too tight, it will wear out the idler bearings faster, too loose and the slop will continue to cause motion errors.
  2. While the belt is loose, check the idler assembly. There are two bearings on the idler shaft and these bearings can wear out. Spinning the pulley by hand, it should feel smooth. If the motion feels rough, replace the Y idler assembly. Note whether the idler housing is silver (3/8" shaft) or black (1/2" shaft). The new style black, 1/2" shaft idler assembly is p/n: CPICQUADIDLX.50 
  3. The belt itself can wear out. Check for the presence of rubber dust around either the Y motor pulley or the Y idler pulley.  Presence of black power dust is a good indication that the teeth of the belt are wearing down. This wear translates to slop between the belt and the pulley, especially on the motor pulley. This slop will cause Y motion time-out errors. Belt p/n: CPICBELTXY
  4. The Y motor is heavy duty and rarely wears out. However the pulley on the motor shaft can become loose. Check the two screws on the Y Motor pulley clamp for tightness. Even a tiny amount of movement can cause problems. The motor can become defective in two ways, electrically or mechanically. Unplug the motor and measure the resistance between pins 1 and 2 (winding A). Then measure the resistance between pins 3 and 4 (winding B). These resistance values must match exactly. (the actual value is not important) If they do not match, assume that some internal windings have shorted and replace the motor. Mechanically, it is impossible to determine the condition of the motor bearings by hand. Replacing the motor is the only sure way to rule a bad motor out. 

    Y Motor p/n: WPICMOT07
    Y Motor and Pulley Assembly p/n: D04065AD.
  5. The Y belt attaches to the head assembly by a belt clamp. Check this clamp for tightness.
  6. Swap the X and Y motor driver cards.  The DIP switch and Jumpers should be set the same, and are directly interchangable. Driver board p/n: WPICBRD04-XY
  7. The Y encoder is located behind (right side) of the head. To access the Y encoder, remove the right side plexiglass panel if a laser is not present. The laser marking option may need to be removed to gain access to the Y encoder. The encoder has a tri-state LED, which can change from green to yellow to red. The LED should be green throughout the entire range of travel. Often times there can be a build up of dust and lint between the encoder eye and the gold encoder strip. Remove the encoder and remove any contaminants using a swab and isopropyl alcohol. Make sure the lens is perfectly clean. Do not unplug the encoder with the machine powered on. This can blow the encoder’s op-amp. Reinstall the encoder and adjust as necessary to achieve the green LED for the complete range of motion. Adjustment is done by manually moving the encoder until the LED is green, tightening the two mounting screws, and checking that the LED stays green when moving the head manually throughout the travel. Y Encoder p/n: WENCRDHD02
  8. Check the encoder gold strip for scratches, cuts, finger prints, oil, etc.  Clean with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth. The scale can have damage if the encoder LED changes from green at a particular location, and cleaning does not correct the condition. The gold scale can be damaged if the encoder body is allowed to contact and rub on the gold scale. If the gold scale is damaged replace with p/n: WENC4XBR.

 

 

Following this procedure should solve Y motion timeout errors. If not, contact BPM technical support.

 

 

 

The X-axis is the long, left/right axis. Also called the upper axis. (Note: For old DOS systems, this would be the "Y" axis) 

The time-out error message is received because the X motor drive system did not get to the encoder position within a certain time period.  This is usually caused by excessive slop in the X drive system. Imagine that the X-axis was commanded to go to X encoder position 35803. The axis moves there but overshoots a little. The motor reverses direction and moves, but again overshoots, the motor reverses again, moves, doesn't get there, moves again and then over shoots. Finally, the motion time period expires, the encoder is not at the desired location, so the error is displayed.  You can imagine that if the X belt was loose, and the X motor turns a fraction of 1 degree, all this does is take up slack, and the encoder never changes position. The solution is to find the source of the slack/slop and correct it.

 

  1. The first item to check is the belt. Unfortunately, there is no measurement tool to determine proper belt tension. Common sense should dictate the tension, but as a simple test, pinch the belt in the middle, and using moderated force, push and pull on the belt and the movement should be no more than about 1 inch. The X idler assembly is on the left side of the belt, and the motor is on the right side.  Four screws will loosen the X motor plate (Note: loosen the bolts that hold the motor plate to the cross beam, not the bolts that hold the motor to the motor plate.) There is a small tensioning screw and nut assembly, between the X motor plate and the Cross beam. Unscrew the nut and the motor will slide to the left, releasing tension. To tighten the belt, the nut must be tightened to force the motor plate to the right. (Note: the tensioning screw must be held stationary while the nut is turned) When the tension is sufficient, tighten the 4 screws to secure the motor plate to the cross beam. Note: If the belt is too tight, it will wear out the idler bearings faster.
  2. While the belt is loose, check the idler assembly. There are two bearings on the idler shaft and these bearings, especially the lower, can wear out. Spinning the pulley by hand, it should feel smooth. If the motion feels rough, replace the X idler assembly. Note whether the idler housing is silver (3/8" shaft) or black (1/2" shaft).
  3. The belt itself can wear out. Note the presence of rubber dust around either the X motor pulley or the X idler pulley.  Presence of black power dust is a good indication that the teeth of the belt are wearing down. This wear translates to slop between the belt and the pulley, especially on the motor pulley. This slop will cause X motion time-out errors.
  4. The X motor is heavy duty and rarely wears out. However the pulley on the motor shaft can become loose. Check the two screws on the pulley clamp for tightness. Even a tiny amount of movement can cause problems. The motor can become defective in two ways, electrically or mechanically. Unplug the motor and measure the resistance between pins 1 and 2 (winding A). Then measure the resistance between pins 3 and 4 (winding B). These resistance values must match exactly. (the actual value is not important) If they do not, assume that some internal windings have shorted and replace the motor. Mechanically, it is impossible to determine the condition of the motor bearings by hand. Replacing the motor is the only sure way to rule a bad motor out. 
  5. The X belt attaches to the gantry/head assembly by a belt clamp. Check this clamp for tightness.
  6. Swap the X and Y motor driver cards.  The DIP switch and Jumpers should be set the same, and are directly interchangeable.
  7. The X encoder is located up on the gantry. To access the X encoder, remove the left side plexiglass panel and locate the two, black, mechanical stop blocks. Remove the left stop block.  The encoder has a tri-state LED, which can change from green to yellow to red. The LED should be green throughout the entire range of travel. Often times there can be a build up of dust and lint between the encoder eye and the gold encoder strip. Remove the encoder and remove any contaminants using a swab and isopropyl alcohol. Make sure the lens is clean. Do not unplug the encoder with the machine powered on. This can blow the encoder’s op-amp. Reinstall the encoder and adjust as necessary to achieve the green LED for the complete range of motion. Adjustment is done by manually moving the encoder until the LED is green, and then tightening the two mounting screws.
  8. Check the encoder gold strip for scratches, cuts, finger prints, oil, etc.  Clean with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth.

 

 

Following this procedure should solve the X motion time-out error. If not, contact BPM technical support.

 

 

Issue

When running BPWin, the software displays an error at startup, similar to the one shown below.

BPWin-Could not create or write registry key

 

Cause

Typically due to using Windows 7 operating system.

Remedy

Right click on the BPWin.exe icon and select "Run as Administrator"

BPWin should now launch correctly.

 

Summary

Customers with BPM equipment which uses parallel ports for serial peripheral communication, Galil DMC-1040 utilizing BPM driver, AND/OR parallel programming sites will only be supported up to BPWin version 5.33.0 due to parallel port driver discontinuation.

Details

BPM Microsystems has announced plans to discontinue parallel port drivers and have taken steps to allow hardware upgrades to handle these changes.

As of version V5.28 of the BPWin software, a new Information Prompt will be displayed if parallel port communications is found, to remind the users that hardware must be upgraded.
This is in preparation for all parallel communications to be discontinued in version V5.34.0.

Below is an example of a new Information Prompt. 

This example is just one of three possible messages: 

  1. Parallel site comm (non-USB sites) 
  2. Parallel SPC comm (Serial Peripheral Controller) (shown above) 
  3. Galil 1040 using BPM Drivers (instead of API drivers) 

If your system reports any of these prompts, then a hardware upgrade is required if you wish to use BPWin V5.34 and higher. 
These prompts cannot be turned off, so as to prevent accidentally forgetting about the upgrades.

User Checks

You may also check the parallel port status of your automated system by using the following guide.

  1. Parallel Port Programming Sites - Automated Programming Systems will need site upgrades to use BPWin versions after v5.33.0.  Other hardware upgrades may be required depending on your specific configuration.
    Please check BPM Site for additional information.
  2. Serial Peripheral Communication – Automated Programming Systems that are communicating to serial peripheral cards via a parallel port (including SIIG card) will need a USB to EPP adapter upgrade to use BPWin versions after v5.33.0 as Serial Peripheral Communication will no longer be supported via a parallel port after v5.33.0. 
    Automated Programming System users can also determine if the handler is configured with the USB to EPP adapter through the PC Device Manager.  
    If “BP Microsystems SPC Interface” is displayed in the Device Manager then the USB to EPP adapter is already installed.  If not, please contact Adaptsys Limited to order an upgrade kit part number: WHARUSBSPCKIT.
  3. Galil DMC-1040 utilizing BPM Driver – Automated Programming Systems that are configured with the Galil DMC-1040 Controller (BPM part number: WMOTCONT01) AND are utilizing the BPM driver will need to upgraded to the Galil API driver to use BPWin versions after v5.33.0.  The BPM driver is a parallel port driver, which will no longer be supported after v5.33.0.

    Automated Programming System users can determine the driver configuration of their system by searching the blackbox.html file (located at C:\BP\Datalog) for the following terms after handler has been initialized
    1. Term A.) Pick-and-Place controller communication via Bpm driver. If you find “Bpm driver” in the log file, then the driver will need to be updated using the attached Galil Pick and Place Controller Configuration.

      Upgrading to the API driver may require a new Galil DMC-1040 board due to potential incompatibilities with some older revisions.  Please contact Adaptsys Limited if you require further assistance.

    2. Term B.) Pick-and-Place controller communication via Api(DMC).
      If you find Api(DMC) in the log file then the driver will NOT need to be updated as the system is already configured with the updated Galil driver for the DMC-1040.
    3. Term C.) Pick-and-Place controller communication via Api(GalilTools).
      If you find Api(GalilTools) in the log file then the system has a Galil DMC-4040 controller.  Galil DMC-4040 will not be impacted by this change as the DMC-4040 only utilizes API(Galil Tools) driver.

 

Please contact your local sales/service representative for further technical or sales information.

 

Further Information

Links to BPM original documents can be found here:

  1. End of Life for Parallel Port Programmer Models
  2. Parallel Port Driver Discontinuation - Certain Automated Programming System Configurations Will Require Hardware Upgrade AND/OR Driver Updates
  3. Discontinuation of Repair and Calibration for X600 and X700 Programming Site Technology 

BPWin 4X series of automated device programmers, have the ability to have programmed parts placed directly into carrier tape and then sealed using the V-TEK TM50 or TM330 taping systems.

To increase the flexibility to handle output reels or programmed parts, BPWin has the ability to create Virtual Reels.

What Are Virtual Reels?

They can be defined as length of of carrier tape containing just a sub quantity of programmed parts from the total job requirement.

Imagine that you have to program 5000 devices, but need to have them on 5 reels of 1000.
This is a perfect scenario for Virtual Reels to be able to split the job in to the required amounts.

How Does It Work?

By using the latest version of BPWin, V5.14.0 and above, you can access the Virtual Reel functions via the Tape Loader Station settings, only available in Autohandler mode.

Essentially, you will only need to define how many parts you need per Virtual Reel, if you require the system to pause at the end of a Virtual Reel and specify either a number of pockets or distance that the tape should advance at the end of the Virtual Reel.

Depending on the chosen settings, the system will program devices and put them in to tape until the number of devices per Virtual Reel is reached at which time either an operator message will be displayed to prompt the the operator to continue or it will automatically advance the tape by the value set.  This process will continue until the total job count is reached.

How Do I Find The Parameters?

As of BPWin v5.32.1, the following details are correct.

Tape Loader Station Settings can be found below.

    • From the BPWin Menu: Autohandler->Tape Loader->Settings
    • In APS view, right click on any Tape Loader station then select the Settings menu option.
    • In Workflow Configuration, clcik on any Tape Loader media then select the Settings menu option.

BPWin Tape Loader Settings

Advance at start of job

When enabled, Tape Loader will advance one pocket when a job starts. This serves as an internal verification that the Tape Loader is functioning properly.

End of reel advance

The job session will present the reload notification when the end of the virtual reel is detected when this option is enabled. This has the effect of pausing the job session until the operator dismisses the reload notification. Unchecking this option will cause the job session to bypass the reload notification when the end of the virtual reel is detected and continue with the job session. This type of action is useful when unattended operation of the job session is desired when using the virtual reel.

Number of devices per virtual reel

Enter the number of devices that will signal a full virtual tape reel during a job session. A virtual tape reel is defined as a section of the physical tape media. When used with the 'End of reel advance' option, you can separate full virtual tape reels during a single job session.

Tape Options Wizard can be found below.

  • From the BPWin Menu: Autohandler->Teach
    When teaching a tape loader station, the Peripheral Selection dialog may appear if BPWin detects more than one of the station type selected. For example, if two tape loaders are connected to the automated programming system, the Peripheral Selection dialog will list both tape loaders. You must select the targeted tape loader that will be taught, then click OK to continue.
  • In APS view, right click on any Tape Loader station then select the Teach menu option.

BPWin Tape Options Wizard

  • Pitch - this value must match the value entered as the pitch on the VTEK unit. The range for this value is from 2mm to 144mm.
  • Speed - this value must match the value entered as the speed on the VTEK unit. The range for this value is from 5 to 250.
  • End of reel advance - this setting determines how many pockets to advance the tape when the end of reel is reached.
  • Specify as pockets - select this to enter the pocket count directly into the Tape Advance field.
  • Specify as distance - select this to enter the distance in mils or millimeters into the Tape Advance field. The distance type is based upon the System of Units selected.
  • Note: Since the tape loader unit is advanced using pocket counts, the entered distance will be converted into pocket counts.
  • Finish button - this button is greyed out 

For further information or assistance, please refer to the BPWin Help File, of contact your Adaptsys Support Engineer.

If you are experiencing communications problems, check to see if the USB 2.0 drivers are installed using the Device Manager setup.
In Windows Device Manager, verify that a BPM Microsystems Programmer Site exists for each programmer site that is attached and powered on.

Drivers are available on the CD ROM supplied with your equipment.

Any new site that is attached should automatically be detected by Windows too.

An option in BPWin Device Menu called VerifyCalibration maybe executed to allow
testing the accuracy of the internal DVM and time base using a bench DVM and
oscilloscope or period counter. We recommend that the following procedure be
performed every 12 months. The procedure may be performed in the field or at the
factory for a fee. If the unit fails the accuracy or the self-diagnostic tests, it must be
returned to the factory for repair and failure analysis.

Equipment required:

  • Digital Volt Meter (must be rated at 0.1% precision)
  • Oscilloscope

Procedures for verifying accuracy of internal DVM:

  1. Open BPWIN
  2. Install the FVE4SM32D in socket A of the master site
  3. Go to File Menu
  4. Select Configure
  5. Ensure 2800 series programmer is displayed click OK
  6. Go to Device Menu
  7. Select VerifyCalibration
  8. Dialog Box “Self Test Configuration” should open
    Note: “Loop mode" will be disabled
    • In this dialog box select the site to be tested and click OK
    • The self test will begin on the site selected
      • If self-test passes, the verifycal procedure will run.
      • If self-test does not pass, it will be skipped for this site, and self-test will begin running on the NEXT selected site. (if applicable)
  9. The VerifyCalibration procedure will do the following:
  10. If any failure occurs the verifycal operation will be aborted for the current site.
  11. The user is presented with a pop-up
    Using a calibrated oscilloscope and scope probe
    1. Connect the probe
    2. Measure the voltage at pins 1 and 2 of DIP socket and check that they fall within the minimum and maximum levels displayed on
    3. the screen.
    4. Click OK.

Procedures for verifying AC calibration:

At this point in the test, the programmer will produce a 1000us pulse width, which is 

generated on pin 2.
Using the oscilloscope verify that the positive pulse on pin one is
between 990us and 1010us.

  1. Click Close to continue
  2. If multiple programmer sites have been selected the self-test will start to run again on the next site, followed by the verifycal procedure described above.

The BlackBox file has a default limit of 10MB. 

  • Once the current log file goes beyond the limit, the file will be archived and a new BlackBox log file created.
    This limit can be changed by editing the Windows registry:
    HKLM\Software\BP Microsystems\BPWin\LogFileLimitMB
  • The "BP\DATALOG" folder has a default limit of 1GB (1024 MB).
    When archiving the current BlackBox.log file, the oldest log file(s) that are beyond this limit will be deleted.
    HKLM\Software\BP Microsystems\BPWin\LogDirectoryLimitMB 

BPWin logs most actions in a "BlackBox" log file, located in the "BP\DATALOG" folder in the home directory, named "BlackBox.html". Each time BPWin is started a new log file is created and session actions are reported. Each action reported has a timestamp in the ISO8601 form of: YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss [+/-]hhmm.The log from a previous session is archived with a file name, "BlackBoxBakX.html" (where 'X' is the index number of the file).

The log file is generated in HTML format which allows embedding of the Job Summary Report and other HTML content directly as-is without converting to text. Microsoft Internet Explorer 9+ or Firefox 6+ is recommended for viewing BlackBox log files. To reduce clutter in the BlackBox log file, collapsible sections are used to group certain pieces of related information together. These sections are collapsed by default, and can be expanded or collapsed by clicking the title of each section. Each section title is bolded and underlined so it can be identified easily. To quickly expand or collapse all sections in the log file, the "Expand/Collapse all sections" button at the top of the log file can be used to view or hide the additional log details.

When the black box log file becomes inaccessible for more than 5 seconds (this happens when the log file is being copied or when the Hard Drive is full, etc), this window will appear and any job session in progress will pause.

 

When the file becomes accessible again, the window will disappear and the job session will continue normally. No logging information will be lost. If you click the "Stop Logging" button the window will disappear and BPWin will resume normal operation, but no further logging attempts will be made for the remainder of the BPWin session. At this point you should stop the job session, close BPWin, resolve the problem, restart BPWin, and then restart the job session again.

The following HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE registry keys determine the size of the BlackBox log file and the size of the directory where the BlackBox log files are stored. The default value can be changed in the registry through "regedit", if desired.

  • HKLM\Software\BP Microsystems\BPWin\LogFileLimitMB - The BlackBox file has a default limit of 10MB. Once the current log file goes beyond the limit, the file will be archived and a new BlackBox log file created.

  • HKLM\Software\BP Microsystems\BPWin\LogDirectoryLimitMB - The "BP\DATALOG" folder has a default limit of 1GB (1024 MB). When archiving the current BlackBox.log file, the oldest log file(s) that are beyond this limit will be deleted.

Note:

  • BlackBox log files named with the older scheme of "bpX.log" will also be deleted when this limit is reached.

  • Since the "DATALOG" folder limited only by size and not a file number limit, the number of files in this folder can grow very large. It is up to the user to delete those files if they choose.

The following list shows the changes made to the latest BPWin beta release software. The current executable beta file is now available on the BPM website for immediate download.

www.bpmmicro.com/software/

BPWin V5.30.0 Beta update "v5300beta0123.exe"
23rd January 2013

Device Changed Model(s) Changes Made & Reasons
Recommended
1) Intersil ZL6105ALAF 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
1) Algorithm is optimized for better yield.
Addition
1) AT24C04C-XHM AT24C04C-XUM 1410/84 1600 1610 
1700 1710 2600 
2610 2700M 2700 
2710M 2710
1) Added support of this device in the SSOP8 package.
2) Atmel ATXMEGA64D3-AU 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
2) Added support of this device in the TQFP64 package.
3) Intersil ZL9117MIRZ 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
3) Added support of this device in the QFN21 package.
4) MX66L51235FZ2I-12G 2800F 2800F-MK2
2800
4) Added support of this device in the WSON8 package.
5) Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP-IT:E 
Micron MT29F2G08ABAEAWP-IT:E
2800F 2800F-MK2
2800
5) Support is released for Custom 18 (Skip_with_BBT_ECC) Bad Block Management Scheme under Device > NAND Options.
6) Samsung KMAKG0000M-B998 2800F-MK2
2800
6) Added support of this device in the BGA169 package for 2800F Flashstream programmer.,
7) STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T6A STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T6 STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T7A STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T7 STMicroelectronics STM32F103C6T 2800 7) Added support of this device in the QFP48 package.
8) STMicroelectronics STM32F103ZFH6TR STMicroelectronics STM32F103ZFH7TR 2800 8) Added support of this device in the BGA144 package.
9) Intersil ZL9101MIRZ 1410/84 1410 1600 
1610 1700 1710 
2600 2610 2700M 
2700 2710M 2710
9) Added support of this device in the QFP21 package.

Summary

Description of Products, Programming Site Technology and Socket Module part numbers.

Details

Products type

  • 1xxx – single site engineering programmer (1710, 1610, 1410/240, 1410/84)
  • 2xxx – multi site production programmer (2710, 2710M, 2610)
  • 3xxx – medium volume automated programmer (APS)(3800, 3000FS, 3710, 3710M, 3610)
  • 4xxx – high volume automated programmer (APS) (4800, 4710, 4710M, 4610)

Programming site technology 

Determines the speed of programming and the ability to support newer devices.

  • x2xx – 2nd Generation programming technology - released 1998
  • x6xx – 6th Generation programming technology – released 2002 (5x faster than x2xx)
  • x7xx – 7th Generation programming technology – released 2004 (FX4 socket module, capable, 10% faster than x6xx technology)
  • x8xx – 8th Generation programming technology – released in 2007 (Flash Memory or Universal Support; Vector Engine Co-Processor for unrivaled programming speeds)
  • xx10 – designated a one half step in technologies (currently designates USB connection)

Socket modules Part Numbering

Part numberExampleDescription
FXXXXXXXXXXX FP1710
FSM84UP All BPM “Finished Goods”, like socket modules and programmer models, start with F.
FSMXXXXXXXXX FSM08BGA
FSM144TQB SM are the initials for “Socket Module”. SM without an A in front of it means a manual socket module that can only be used on manual programmers (1XXX and 2XXX series.) The SM designation is also present when the item is a "Replacment D-card" (See L,LX2,LX4,W,WX2, and WX4 entries) and also a "Socket Card" (See FVE2 and FVE4 entries).
FASMXXXXXXXX FASM128PQH
FASMR32MLFA A in the part number means “Automated”. Automated socket modules can be used on any BPM programmer. If there is not an "A" before the "SM" then the item is not Automated capable and can only be used on manual programmers (1XXX and 2XXX series.) ASM socket modules and SM socket modules are priced on capability.
FASMRXXXXXXX FASMR80QHG
FSMR32LQF R in the part number indicates that the socket module has a"Receptacle Base" with the ability to exchange sockets through a quick-change connector.
FX4ASMR64XXX FX4ASMR64LQFB This number indicates the "Pin Count" of device that is programmable on this item.
FX4ASMR64BGJ FX4ASMR64BGK Final charaters are the "Name" of the item which distinguishes it from any other. Attempt is made to relate the name to the "Package Type" to make it more meaningful and easier to remember.
FASMHXXXXXXX FASMH08MLP "H" indicates the socket module uses a "High Performance" socket rated at 50,000 insertion cycles.
FASMLXXXXXX FASML84BGD "L" indicates the socket module uses a "Long Life" socket rated at 100,000 insertion cycles. (More in some cases).
FASMCXXXXXX FASMC08MLFM "C" indicates the socket module uses a "Compression Mount" also referred to as "Surface Mount" socket. These sockets are field replaceable but it requires more effort than "R" versions.
FX2ASMRXXXX FX2ASM64CBG "X2" indicates the socket module contains "2" daughter cards with 2 sockets total on the socket module. Use of this type of FX2 socket module is limited to all X7XX programmers (3710, 1710, 2700 etc…). Used when size of sockets does not allow for 4-socket population.
FX4ASMRXXXX FX4ASMR48TD
FX4ASM80SPI
FX4SM56BG "X4" indicates the socket module contains "4" daughter cards with 4 sockets total on the socket module. Use of this type of FX4 socket module is limited to all X7XX programmers (3710, 1710, 2700 etc…)
FVEXXXXXXXXX
FVE2XXXXXXXX
FVE4XXXXXXXX
FVEG3XXXXXXX
FVEASMXXXX
FVE2ASMR32PG
FVE4ASM08LAPG
FVEG3ASMR100X
"VE" denotes a "Socket Card" that is used on 8th Generation programmers. "VE" is a reference to the Vector Engine which is responsible for the quick programming speed that is capable on this platform. A 2 or 4 after the "VE" as in "VE2" or "VE4" denotes an 8th gen socket card whereby 2 or 4 of the same model of socket card can be installed on each 8th gen site. If neither 2 or 4 is present then only 1 socket card is capable of being installed on each site. "G" denotes gang in the FVEG3 example and denotes a single board that has 3 sockets populated.
WXXXXXXXXXX
WX2XXXXXXXX
WX4XXXXXXXX
WASM100BGS
WX2ASM63FBGD
WX4ASM115BGB
"Replacement D-card" items. When corresponding items on F,FX, and FX4 reach the end of their life cycle these items can be ordered as replacement parts.
LXXXXXXXXXXX
LX2XXXXXXXXX
LX4XXXXXXXXX
LASM64MLFG
LX2ASM100LQFA
LX4ASM08BGA
"Replacement D-card" items. When corresponding items on F,FX, and FX4 reach the end of their life cycle these items can be ordered as replacement parts. These items are distinguished from the above "W' version as these are confirmed to be Pb-free and to support the programming of Pb-free devices.
CSOCXXXXXXXX CSOCM32YA "Replacement Socket" for specific socket module, socket card, or replacement D-card.
LSOCXXXXXXX LSOC28SS "Replacement Socket" for specific socket module, socket card, or replacement D-card. These items are distinguished from the above "C' version as these are confirmed to be Pb-free and to support the programming of Pb-free devices..

Label Printing

BPWin can generate printed labels and programmed RFID tags using dynamic data from the current job session. All label printers that support a text-based command language are supported. This includes virtually all commercial and industrial major-brand label printers from suppliers such as Zebra, Wasp, Datamax, and many more. All barcode types are supported, limited only by the capabilities of the printer that you choose. BPWin will print the label using real-time values from the job session for text fields and barcode encoding. For label printers that also support RFID tag programming, BPWin can generate the content for the tag in tandem with any printed label.

Because BPWin interfaces with the printer using the Windows print driver and a text-based command language, you don't have to hassle over your particular printer model being supported. In fact, any printer that supports this style of interface is ready to plug-and-play with BPWin. Examples of text-based command languages are: EPL, ZPL, ZPL2, WPL, or any other supplier's proprietary format, so long as it is a text-based command language sent directly to the printer. What this means is that the label content sent to the printer is comprised of command codes that are interpreted by the printer itself to generate the text, barcodes, RFID, etc. This is opposed to sending graphical data directly to the printer, such is the case with conventional document printing. This scheme allows the printer to create complex content like barcodes on-the-fly, without BPWin having to natively support any particular barcode format.

You may design your own labels from scratch or immediately use BPWin's built-in default label. You are free to use any label design software. Generally, free WYSIWYG design software will be provided with the label printer. There are also commercial products that will work too. Alternatively, if you are adept at any of the printer's command languages (eg ZPL2), you can code your own label simply with a text-editor. The text that comprises the commands to send to the printer can be generated by the label design software in the form of a text file. In BPWin, these files are referred to as "Printer Command Files".

BPWin presently supports printing a label at the end of the job session and when it has detected that a destination media needs to be reloaded. For the label at the end of a job, this will occur at the same point in time as when the job summary report is displayed. For the end of media label, this will occur at the same point in time as when BPWin prompts you to reload the media. All of the important aspects of the job setup are available as dynamic content to the label. This includes items such as device quantity, job master file name, job ID, device part number, data pattern information, system information, and much more.

The default label provided in BPWin is a 3"x4" label in ZPL format, optimized for the Zebra GK420d direct-thermal label printer. Any label printer configured to accept ZPL commands will work with the default. You may have to adjust speed and darkness to produce the best quality label with your particular printer and label stock. This label contains important job session information, and incorporates the use of Code128 linear barcodes and the DataMatrix 2-D barcode. Here is what the label looks like, with some example job session content:

 bpwin-print

How to Design Labels

Designing a label entails using a separate graphical application to specify the information you wish to convey, layout, and formatting of a label. No special skill is required to design labels; usually there is more than adequate help documentation that is included with label design software that only takes a few minutes to read, comprehend, and get you up and running. Here we will assume that you have familiarized yourself with your label design software and are capable of creating a label with it that can be used with your label printer.

Printer Command Files

You should find that your label design software can print your designed labels. Usually, invoking these commands provide options to "Print to file" instead of actually printing a label. When exercising this option, the software will prompt you for a location to save the file. It is this file that is used as the "Printer Command File" in BPWin, since it is comprised of the text commands to send to the printer to print your label.

Specifying BPWin-provided Dynamic Content

The aspects of a job setup that you wish to be included in a label are specified by placing one of several special strings of characters at the location in the label where you would like the content to appear. These strings of characters are referred to here as "tags". What follows is the current list of tags, and the description of the content that BPWin replaces the tag with when it prints your label:

Tag

Description

{BpmJobQty}

What was entered in the quantity text box, no commas.

{BpmDevicesPassed}

How many devices were passed then placed into the output, not just passed by the programmer.

{BpmJobName}

The root name of the JobMaster file. (eg "Job123")

{BpmJobFilename}

The JobMaster filename plus extension. (eg "Job123.bp").

{BpmJobFilepath}

The full path and full filename of the the JobMaster file. (eg "\\CustomerJobs\MyCustomer\Job123.bp")

{BpmJobId}

The operator supplied JobId.

{BpmModel}

Programmer site model. (eg "BP-2710").

{BpmSwVer}

The BPWin version (eg "5.10.0"). Includes a designator for betas ("Beta").

{BpmDeviceName}

The device name excluding the manufacturer

{BpmDeviceManuf}

The manufacturer of the device

{BpmDataFilepath}

The name of the buffer as it appears in the main BPWin window

{BpmDataFilename}

The full path of the data pattern file

{BpmDataTimestamp}

The data pattern file timestamp in IS08601 UTC format ("Zulu Time"). (eg "YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ssZ"). This is the time without any timezone shifts, and the 'Z' at the end designates this.

{BpmDataChecksum}

The same data pattern checksum that is displayed in the job summary

{BpmSystemName}

The Windows machine name for the host system.

{BpmUserName}

The Windows user account name used to access the system.

{BpmJobEndDate}

The date in ISO8601 format (eg "2010-03-08") when the job session completed.

{BpmJobEndTime}

The job time in ISO8601 format with timezone (eg "hh:mm:ss [+/-]hhmm") when the job session completed.

In addition to the "end of job" tags above, "end of media" labels support the tags described in the table below. Note that specifying any of these in an "end of job" label will result in an error.

Tag

Description

{BpmMediaDeviceResults}

Device operation result statistics for all devices in the filled media. For example:

Not Blank: 5

Continuity: 7

Verify: 3

This would mean that 5 devices failed the "Blank Check" portion of their operation, 7 failed the "Continuity" portion, and 3 failed "Verify". Note that for most media populated by being specified in the "Destination" field of the autohandler workflow dialog, this table will merely consist of a single "Passed" statistic whose number matches the number of devices in the media. An example such as the one above would most likely be found in a label that was printed for the reject media.

{BpmMediaNumActualDevices}

The total number of devices in the media.

{BpmMediaMaxNumDevices}

The media's capacity. This value can currently only be provided for trays, otherwise BPWin will replace this tag with "N/A".

{BpmMediaName}

The name of the destination as specified in the "Destination" field in the autohandler workflow settings window.

{BpmMediaTimeOfFirstDevice}

The date/time that the first device was placed into the media.

{BpmMediaTimeOfLastDevice}

The date/time that the last device was placed into the media.

{BpmMediaNumBlankDevices}

The number of devices in the media that never had a device operation attempted to be performed.

Configuring BPWin to Print Labels

The label printing feature can be configured in BPWin by selecting menu items Tools/Label Printing..., which opens the "Label Printing" window:

bpwin-print2 

To use this window to configure label printing:

  1. To print labels at the end of a job session, click the "Enable" box in the "Print label at end of job session" section to place a check in it. To print labels when BPWin has detected that an output media needs to be reloaded, place a check in the "Enable" box in the "Print label at end of output media" section.

    The following instructions can be applied to both end of job label printing and end of media label printing.
  2. Select a printer by clicking on the combo box labeled "Printer" to view the list of printers on your system. From the list presented, click the name of the printer you would like BPWin to use to print labels. Clicking on the printer name will make that printer the printer selected in the combo box.
  3. At this point you can choose to exercise one of these two options:
  1. a.Click the button labeled "..." to browse for a printer command file that you have previously created. Doing so will place the path to the selected file in the "Printer Command File" field.
    or
  2. b.Click the "Default" button to specify that you would like BPWin to use the default label distributed with BPWin. This will place the text "" in the Printer Command File field.
  1. If you would like to see what the label will look like when one is printed at the end of a job session, click the "Test" button. BPWin will make a temporary copy of the contents of the printer command file in PC RAM, replace all tags in those contents with a version of the content that reflects the current configuration of BPWin, and print a label by sending those contents to the printer.
  2. When you're done configuring label printing, click OK to close the Label Printing window. The settings are stored in the system registry and will be restored the next time you open BPWin.

Example Procedure

The following procedure uses all of the information provided above to create and use a label in BPWin that includes:

  • Number of passed devices.
  • Programmer site model.
  • Device name.
  • Data pattern checksum.
  1. Using label designing software, such as the one that was most likely included with your printer, first design a label that is composed of only individual field names that are descriptive of each of the items listed above. Here is what an example of this would look like using Zebra Technologies Corporation ZebraDesigner Label Design Application:

    bpwin-print3

    You should find that you can apply the basic concepts described in this procedure for the ZebraDesigner software to any other label design application.
  2. Specify where you would like BPWin to place its dynamic content by placing the appropriate tags in those locations:
    bpwin-print4
  3. To demonstrate the use of bar codes, we will also configure the label to place a DataMatrix bar code to also contain the number of passed devices right next to the human-readable "Devices passed:" field in the label. When such a bar code is inserted into a label using ZebraDesigner, this is what its configuration screen looks like, notice that we've typed {BpmDevicesPassed} for its content, the effect will be that BPWin will replace that tag in the printer command file with the number of devices passed, ultimately resulting in a bar code that represents the number of devices passed in the job session:

    bpwin-print5

    This is what the label now looks like in ZebraDesigner with the inserted bar code:
    bpwin-print6
  4. Print the label, but make sure to use the "Print to File" option. In ZebraDesigner, this is what that entails:
    1. Choose File/Print... from the menu.
      bpwin-print7


      As a result ZebraDesigner presents a "Print" window that includes a "Print to file" checkbox:
      bpwin-print8
    2. Make sure to place a check in the "Print to file" box and then click the "Print" button. This will close the "Print" window and you will be presented with a "Print to file" window that will allow you to specify the file to save as a "Print file (*.prn)" file type:
      bpwin-print9
    3. Specify a file name and location. Make a note of the location because you will need it later in the procedure. When you're ready, click the "Save" button. The "Print to file" window will close and the file will be saved in the location you specified. This file is referred to in BPWin and in this help documentation as the "printer command file". For this example we created a new folder in "My Documents" named "Label Printing" and specified the file name "Example.prn".
  5. Configure BPWin to print labels at the end of the job session using the file saved in step 4c above by following this procedure:
    1. Configure BPWin to run a job session. For this example, we selected device Micro MT29F64G08TAAWPET:A and loaded a data pattern named DGF-24-DIG-00387-00.bin.
    2. In BPWin, choose menu items Tools/Label Printing.... The "Label Printing" window will open:
      bpwin-print10
    3. Place a check in the "Print label at end of job session" box. You will now be able to select a label printer and specify the printer command file that we saved in step 4c above.
    4. Select your label printer in the "Printer" field. In this example we use "Zebra GK420d":
      bpwin-print12
    5. Click the button labeled "..." to specify the printer command file you saved in step 4c above. Doing so presents an "Open" window that will allow you to browse for the file. For this example we selected the file we saved in step 4c above by navigating to folder "Label Printing" under "My Documents" and selecting the file named "Example.prn".
    6. Click the "Open" button in the "Open" window. This will close the "Open" window and bring you back to the "Label Printing" window where you can see that the file you selected has been specified as the "Printer Command File". For our example, this is what that looks like:


      At this point you can print a test label by clicking the "Test" button. For our example, this is what our test label looks like:
      bpwin-print13
    7. Click "OK" in the "Label Printing" window. The "Label Printing" window will close. BPWin is now configured to print labels at the end of the job session. For this example a job session with 4 devices was run, at the end of which BPWin printed this label:
      bpwin-print14

With the introduction of the BPWin software, the configuration settings are no longer saved to a file.
These settings are now being saved in the Windows Registry and are not deleted upon being uninstalled.
This allows the user to continue to use previous settings when upgrading to a new version of the software. 

When removing other USB devices (for example, Flash Drives) connected to the PC while a USB programmer is actively engaged in an operation, use the "Safely Remove Hardware" icon in the Windows system tray first to avoid potential communication errors.
"Surprise Removals" can be problematic on some PCs if the removed USB device is connected to the same USB hub as the programmer, including integrated hubs inside of most PCs.
The "Safely Remove Hardware" icon will appear for devices that Microsoft recommends its usage.
In the event that such a communication error does occur, BPWin will terminate the operation and report the error issued by the Operating System.

Your USB 1.1 port will work just fine but will communicate slower.
Contact us to discuss the purchase of an USB 2.0 expansion card.

USB 2.0 is extremely reliable. All data transactions are integrity checked using the very comprehensive CRC32 calculation. Additionally, the USB hardware will retry any packets that fail the integrity check during transfer. This makes the USB bus extremely robust in that it can withstand transient events in the environment (ESD, EMI and other electrical noise, and faulty connection) without breaking the flow in other hardware and software systems. USB also has strict requirements on cabling, PCB routing, and connectors. All of this is done to provide a very controlled electrical environment.  

BPM Microsystems is committed to providing customers with the highest level of support in the device programming industry. The value we provide to our customers is delivered as a package of high-quality programming hardware, powerful software and award-winning technical support.
Our Support Agreement customers recognize the importance of complementing their programming hardware with the latest BPWin software. Continuous improvements that include algorithm code revisions and software features enhance the usability of the programmer so that it
operates even more effectively today than it did yesterday.
Support Agreement customers have access to the resources needed to perform the programming job with confidence. When assistance is required, customers know our technical support team has the expertise and is there to help.

BPM Microsystems’ Support Agreement* includes:

Access to the Latest BPWin Software Updates

  • 8 scheduled full software releases - software enhancements including improved features,added functionality, ease of use and greater performance. All current updates are compiled in each full release of BPWin. 
  • Access to all the latest fully tested algorithms - allows you to take advantage of our expanding library of currently supported devices. 
  • Receive immediate notification of critical changes made to existing algorithms in BPWin. 
    Maintaining your programming equipment with the latest BPWin algorithms assures you the highest quality, best production yield and use of the latest optimized algorithms supporting your programmable devices. 
  • Daily beta software releases ensures quick access to all the latest algorithms and updates that have been added without waiting for the next full software release.
  • Favorable pricing for each programmer support agreement when renewed by the software expiration date.

Priority Technical Support

  • Direct access to the people with the knowledge and resources to help you troubleshoot and solve your most difficult software or hardware issues.
  • Contact the BPM Microsystems’ technical experts via telephone or email.
  • Support Agreement customers receive the highest priority.

Device Support with Guaranteed Delivery Date – Manual Production

Receive up to four GDP credits equal to a maximum value of $500 each to be used during the valid contract period at no additional cost. With our Guaranteed Delivery Program (GDP), which guarantees that a new device will be supported in BPWin by a specific date, customers can apply one credit toward the algorithm price, one credit toward the expedite fee, and/or one credit toward the socket card NRE fee (see table for details). Once a device support request has been received, it is analyzed in order to generate a quotation. Based upon the August 7, 2012 complexity of the device and the Device Support Department workload, a date for completion is scheduled. Customers may submit requests at any time, and should receive a GDP quotation for support within approximately 48 hours, providing we have all of the necessary information. If the new support requires socket module/card development, a Device/Socket Solution Development Quote will be provided along with the expected release date.

Device Support with Guaranteed Delivery Date – Automated Production

Receive up to six GDP credits equal to a maximum value of $500 each to be used during the valid contract period at no additional cost. With our Guaranteed Delivery Program (GDP), which guarantees that a new device will be supported in BPWin by a specific date, customers can apply one credit toward the algorithm price, one credit toward the expedite fee, and/or one credit toward the socket card NRE fee (see table for details). Once a device support request has been received, it is analyzed in order to generate a quotation. Based upon the complexity of the device and the Device Support Department workload, a date for completion is scheduled. Customers may submit requests at any time, and should receive a GDP quotation for support within approximately 48 hours, providing we have all of the necessary information. If the new support requires socket module/card development, a Device/Socket Solution Development Quote will be provided along with the expected release date.

Eligible Concurrent Programmers*  Quotation for Guaranteed Delivery of an AlgorithmDevice/Socket Solution
Development Quote
 Algorithm Price**  Expedite Fee**  NRE Fee**
 

2800F, 2800F-MK2, 2800, 3000FS,
3000FS-MK2, 3800, 4800

One GDP One GDP One GDP***
 2610, 2710, 3610, 3710, 4610, 4710 One GDP One GDP Not Applicable

2600, 2700, 2700M, 3600, 3700,
4600, 4700

One GDP One GDP Not Applicable

*Eligible concurrent programming systems must have a current software contract with GDP credits available to take advantage of this offer.

**One GDP has a maximum value of $500.00 and is completely exhausted regardless of redeemed value when utilized.

***Applicable to "FVE" style 8th Generation and Flashstream Socket Card Development NRE fee only.

*This Support Agreement includes software updates, priority technical support and device support with guaranteed delivery date. The support period is approximately one calendar year, but actual support dates will vary based on the availability of 8 full software releases. Extended hardware warranty is excluded and may be available for separate purchase. The following parallel port programmer models will go end of life and will be supported only through BPWin version 5.33.0, scheduled for release on July 16, 2013 - 1600, 1700, Silicon Sculptor II, 2600, 2700, 2700M, 3600, 3700, 4600, 4700.

 

Handlers

Please use this complete nozzle chart to help identify nozzles that you need to fit your handler or laser.

Complete nozzle chart 2017

 

Contact Adaptsys for a quotation for your nozzles.

Scenario

You have a TS1500 installed on your handler but when you run a job, the tray stacker does not operate and no trays are cycled.

Solution

Check that the TS1500 is powered up and that there are no errors displayed on the error led indicators on the front panel.

Check that TS1500 is detected by BPWin when you initialise the system.

Check that you correctly set your workflow and specified TS1500 as your Source and Destination.  If this is not set to TS1500, then BPWin will not communicate with the tray stacker.

If the problem persists, then open a support ticket and include all pertinent information such as relevant BB files, screenshots and error messages.

Indicators

Pick errors, place errors or vision centering problems occur frequently during a job session.

Troubleshoot

  1. Ensure that the stations and the package are taught correctly. This is the cause of the majority of Pick-and-Place problems.

  2. Run the Pick-and-Place Runout Test to ensure that the nozzle is installed correctly.

  3. Run the CyberOptics Image Quality Test to ensure that the camera is receiving a quality image. Even if the test returns successfully, it is worth following the cleaning procedure.

  4. Inside the package teach

  5. The device could be slipping on the nozzle:

    • Ensure that the correct type of nozzle is being used for the package. Use the largest nozzle possible while ensuring that the diameter of the nozzle is shorter than the shortest side of the device (the nozzle does not overlap the sides of the device). For some DIP devices, even smaller nozzles are more effective.

    • Ensure air pressure at input is regulated to 80 psi.

    • Ensure that the vacuum at the nozzle is 24-27 in/Hg. Check for vacuum leaks/obstructions if the vacuum is weak.

    • Use the I/O and Sensors Diagnostic Dialog to test the vacuum system. Ensure that system is detecting nozzle obstructions. If using a 3000 series autohandler, the vacuum switch can be adjusted to change the voltages.

  6. If using media that can move around (tape feeder/loader, label presenter, etc), when teaching, turn off Auto Learn Z-axis inside the Adjust Nozzle Position Dialog and manually position the nozzle on the device. This allows the operator to have very fine control over where the nozzle will lower to when picking or placing.

  7. If using media that is inconsistent in its Z-axis position (warped trays), go to the package teach dialog and increase the number of Pick Retries.

  8. If using a label presenter, ensure that the label is being presented in less than 1 second.

  9. If errors happen more frequently after the job session has been running for a while, drift may be occurring. Open the Pick-and-Place Motion Diagnostic Dialog to run the "Measure X-axis and Y-axis encoder drift" diagnostic and the "Measure W-axis motor step drift with Diagnostic Nozzle" diagnostic.

  10. Run the CyberView Optics Diagnostic Utility to troubleshoot optics. In particular, run the Alignment Camera to Nozzle Coplanar Calibration procedure to ensure that the device enters into the camera's field of view.

There are a variety of different programming sites available on BPM Microsystems handlers, each have different stepper motors, T-posts and power supplies.
This guide serves as a way to help identify the site technology that you have and the associated parts to aid in ordering spare parts.

Site Technologies and Spares

Please note that all 6th and 7th generation sites, such as 3600 or 4600 are no longer supported by BPM and should be upgrade to X610 type sites.

Site TypePartPart Number
3610/4610 SITE FX610-240SITE
3610/4610  STEPPER W4100STEPRPLC 
3610/4610  T POST  D02959AD 
3610/4610  T POST TALL  D02837AD 
3610S/4610S  SITE FX610-240-2-STE 
3610S/4610S  STEPPER D05136AD
3610S/4610S  T POST  D02959AD 
3610S/4610S  T POST TALL  D02837AD 
3710/4710  SITE FX710-240SITE
3710/4710  STEPPER  W4100STEPRPLC
3710/4710  T POST  D02959AD 
3710/4710  T POST TALL  D02837AD 
3710/4710  PSU  CPWS082.2NFYCAP 
3710S/4710S  SITE  FX710-240-2-STE 
3710S/4710S STEPPER  D05136AD 
3710S/4710S  T POST  D04661AD 
3710S/4710S  T POST TALL  D04652AD 
3710S/4710S  PSU  CPWS082.2NFYCAP
3000FS  SITE  FX800F-SITE 
3000FS  STEPPER  D05135AD
3000FS  T POST  D04500AD 
3000FS  PSU  LPWSEXT24V 
3800/4800  SITE 16GB  FX800-SITE 
3800/4800  SITE 326GB  FX800-SITE-32 
3800/4800  SITE 64GB  FX800-SITE-64 
3800/4800  STEPPER  D05135AD 
3800/4800 T POST  D04500AD
3800/4800 3800 PSU LPWSEXT24V
3800/4800 4800 PSU LPWS24V01

Notes: D04664AD is obsolete and now uses D05136AD.  D04473AD is now obsolete and now uses D05135AD.
These are the exact same motors and shaft lengths, with the only change is the shaft material. Old type is brass, new type is stainless steel for strength.

T Post Selection

Programming sites use T-posts that are threaded in to the stepper motors, used to open and close the sockets to allow devices to placed for programming.
There are various T Post types used and correct selection is based on the automated programming site style and the height of the socket module in use.

When choosing a device to program in BPWin, there will be information to explain which socket modules can be used and the T-post required for any given socket module.
Refer to the examples shown below to further assist in choosing the correct T-post or if you need to order replacements.

 

Programming Site Style A (example: 4600) and Style B (example: 4610) are compatible with both D02959AD “Normal” T-post or D02837AD “Tall” T-post.

STYLE ASTYLE B
bpm-site-style-a bpm-site-style-b
t-post-d02959ad t-post-d02837ad
 D02959AD "Normal" and D02837AD "Tall" T-Posts 

 NOTE: Style A, X600 type sites are obsolete and should be upgraded to X610.

Programming Site Style C (example: 4710S) is compatible with D04661AD “Normal” T-post or D04652AD “Tall” T-post.

STYLE C
bpm-site-style-c
t-post-d04661ad t-post-d04652ad
 D04661AD "Normal" and D04652AD  "Tall" T-Posts

 

 

Programming Site Style D (example: 4800) is compatible with D04500AD “Normal” T-post only.

STYLE D
bpm-site-style-d
t-post-d04500ad
 D04500AD

 

Summary Table

Site Style"Normal" T-post"Tall" T-post

A

D02959AD

D02837AD

B

D02959AD

D02837AD

C

D04661AD

D04652AD

D

D04500AD

NA

 

Each T Post is fitted with ball plungers, which are used to unsure secure fitting of the pressure plates.
These plungers are consumable items and can wear down.

Replacement parts can be order, using the following numbers.
CAIRPLU02 is the white tip plunger
CAIRPLU03 is the red tip plunger

If you are still unsure as to which T Post you should be using with your programming site, then please either call your local support engineer or submit a support request for further information.

The 3800MK2 uses an upward and downward vision camera system for aligning devices.

If you find that you have no downward camera Image then check the following points. 

  1. Do you have Power and Activity LEDs on the downward camera?
    If Yes then we know there is power and communications at the camera.
    If No, investigate why these are not present, try restarting the whole system.
  2. Make sure someone didn't put the cap back on the lens.
  3. Go to Autohandler > Pick-and-Place > Diagnostics > View Upward Vision Image/View Downward Vision Image. The light ring should automatically turn on and you should see the camera image. The downward camera gets power from the light ring, so if the light ring doesn't come on the camera won't either. 
  4. Leave the diagnostic open and shake the purple cable going into the downward camera. See if the image starts to flicker.
  5. Check the F stop setting on the camera. It should be between 8 and 16. If this is way off then there could be no light coming into the camera. Check that the F stop locking ring is secure. Take something like a part and put it right in front of the camera lens to see if the image changes.

If you still have issues, then collect the usual screen shots and BlackBox files and submit a support ticket for further help.

Summary

Procedure to evaluate and troubleshoot why devices are placed at an angle.

 

Details

The angular placement can be any angle, 5 degree, 30 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree, etc. This angular placement can be seen in the sockets, tray, laser nozzles or anywhere else.
The problem can be random, intermittent, occasional, or constant and can be seen during teach or production.

Check Points

  1. Is the Z bellows loose?
    If loose, tighten. 
  2. Is the Z bellow straight?  
    Check nozzle runout is within specification, replace bellows if required.
  3. Is there a strong vacuum on the nozzle?
    Devices can slip on the nozzle if the vacuum is too weak.
    Attached a vacuum gauge to the installed nozzle and turn on the vacuum to see what pressure you are getting.  If too low, investigate the cause further.
  4. Check Theta drive system for correct operation.
    There could be a problem with either the Theta motor or the Theta motor driver.
    In 4X systems, the Theta motor driver board can be swapped with the Z axis motor driver board, provided the correct DIP switches are set.

    Depending on the BPWin version you are running, then there is a W (Theta) axis drift check.  This will require the use of a special nozzle, part number CPICNOZTESTJIG, which is included in the standard nozzle kit since 2011
    To access this test, go to Main Menu/Autohandler/Diagnostics/Pick and Place Motion. Select the W Axis Drift Test from the pull down menu and follow the instructions on screen.
    If the test fails, make sure that the CPICNOZTESTJIG is a snug fit on the Z bellows.
    If the fit is too loose, the test will fail.
    If the fit is tight and the test fails, replace first the theta motor, then if the rotational problems still exist, replace the theta driver.

    The theta motor is a 2 phase stepper motor, so each of the motor's two internal windings can be checked for integrity by measuring the resistance of each winding (pin 1 & 2 vs pin 3 & 4).  The resistance values should match exactly. The actual value is not that important. If the resistance values do not match exactly, replace the motor.

    It is possible, but extremely rare, that the CyberOptic system is the cause. Check the CyberOptic system by running the Main Menu/Autohandler/Diagnostics/Cyberview utility. Click the Capture button and get a screen shot of the results. This is a good indicator of the CyberOptic system, to check that it is working normally. More information on using Cyberview diagnostics is available in BPWin Help. Also see CyberOptic test interpretation document below:

Machine specific considerations:

3x00 - First check that the break-away coupler that connects the theta motor shaft to the Z bellows is not rubbing on the underside of the motor body. There should be a tiny gap so that rubbing does not occur. Loosen the set screw and slide the coupler down a little. 

Breakaway coupler clearance.PNG

 

It is possible that the W axis drift test passes but the theta motor is still defective. The 3x00 theta motor part number is D04336PD. It should be noted that the theta motor cable, along with the laser pointer and vacuum switch cables should be tie wrapped to the laser pointer housing to prevent cable flexing, which will quickly break the theta motor conductors where they exit the motor. 

Secured Theta Harness.PNG

 

The theta driver on a 3x00 is not swappable with any other driver in the E-Box. It is completely different. The theta driver part number is D04152AD. The echain cables have a high flex rating and they seldom fail.

 

4x00 - The theta motor is usually stable. However, you may check the set screw on the theta motor flex coupler, located underneath the motor, attached to the motor shaft. The replacement theta motor is part number WPICMOT04. 

 

The theta driver board can be swapped with the Z driver. The DIP switches on the drivers must be reset to their respective axes. 

4XDriverDIPs.PNG

The replacement theta driver part number is WPICBRD04-T. 4x00s with the old style e-chain ribbon cables should consider replacing these cables (upper and/or lower) only if replacing both the motor and driver do not solve the rotational problem. Upper ribbon cable part number: CPICCAB02, Lower ribbon cable part number: CPICCAB01.

BPM have recently added new features in BPWin, starting from 5.40, to support the new 3800MK2 that uses both upward and downward vision.

When installing new versions of software, it appears that as default, BPWin enables a new hardware function check that does not exist on other handlers.

The Problem

Are you seeing the following error message?

vision-component-fail

 

The Solution

To rectify the problem, close BPWin, then open the registry editor and navigate to:

32BIT: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SOFTWARE>BPM Microsystems>BPWin>AutoHandler>Components

64BIT: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SOFTWARE>Wow6432Node>BPM Microsystems>BPWin>AutoHandler>Components

In the right window you will see UseUpwardDownwardVisionComponentsCheck the DWORD.
The following screenshot shows the DEFAULT value after I installed 5.44.1.


UseUpwardDownwardVision
If it is set to 1, change it to 0 then close registry editor and start BPWin which will now initialise correctly.

This key is used to enable/disable the upward camera, so if it is set to 1 BPWin is expecting to communicate with it.  This should be set to 0 for all 4x/3x types unless it has an upward camera.

 

Error Message:

The Pick-and-Place could not learn the package thickness because the end of the device could not be detected. If the package thickness is greater than XX mils, click the OK button to continue. Otherwise click the Cancel button, correct the problem, and retry the operation. Note: The package thickness could be beyond the physical limitations of the Pick-and-Place. For example, the thickness of a DIP package including its leads is well beyond the allowable travel distance of the nozzle from its home position to the reverse limit of 96 mils.

Automeasure for PLCC will usually fail on 4x00 systems and sometimes on 3x00 systems. When the handler tries to move the Z rod up high enough so the Cyber camera can see under the device, the Z up limit sensor gets triggered first. This is the cause of the message. The real problem is the extreme thickness of all PLCCs, and many PQFP's.

 

Solutions:

  1. Readjust the Z up limit metal "flag" so that it triggers very close to the mechanical limit. This will increase the up limit travel. Note that changing the limit flag will require that the handler be forced to re-find its limits (delete the C:\BP\BP3100\H04xxxxxxxxx\Global Settings\PNPlimits.pnp file and restart BPWin) Also, there is no guarantee that changing the flag will allow enough clearance to Automeasure PLCC.
  2. Lower the Cyberoptic camera by the use of shims, washers, etc. This will in effect also increase the Z up limit travel. However, all teaches must be deleted, and all locations for every job must be re-taught because the Z coordinate has been altered for every teach. Again, there is no guarantee that changing the Cyberoptic height will allow enough clearance to Automeasure PLCC.
  3. In later BPWin Versions, clicking OK may allow Automeasure to continue without finding the thickness. 
  4. Do nothing. Accept that the machine has a limit on the maximum thickness it can successfully Automeasure.
  5. As an alternative to Automeasure, input a reasonable Alignment Offset value (for all PLCC's try 40 mils), and then either use calipers to measure the LxW or let the Cyber system measure the LxW. 

Weekly – 10 minutes

  • Inspect nozzle O-rings and replace, as necessary.

  • Inspect Z-rod bellows for proper movement (compression and extension).

  • Check nozzle runout.

  • Check air and vacuum gauges.

  • Remove debris and devices from work area.

  • Dust off programmer sites and socket modules with clean, dry compressed air.

Monthly – 50 minutes

  • Replace Z-rod vacuum filter (part number:  CPICFIL02).

  • Clean X and Y-axes linear encoder scales with a non-abrasive lint-free wipe. Use no solutions.

  • Check compressed air filter bowls for water or oil. Empty and clean, as necessary.

  • Inspect all moving parts for signs of excessive wear.

  • Replace any broken stepper motors (part number:  W4100STEPRPLC).

  • Clean tape loader sealer head assembly, if applicable.

Quarterly – 35 minutes

  • Vacuum the cabinet air intake filter.

  • Clean the computer air filter.

  • Clean the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera lens using the Normal Cleaning Procedure. To remove fingerprints or other oily deposits, use the Cleaning Procedure for Persistent Problems.

  • Replace laser carbon filter (part number:  W4100FILTER).

  • Check laser interlock sensors for proper operation. Tighten any loose mounting hardware.

  • Inspect laser HEPA filter, replace if needed (part number:  CLASHAR02).

  • Replace any broken stepper motors (part number:  W4100STEPRPLC).

  • Inspect vibratory feeder springs for signs of wear or damage.

  • Replace in-line vacuum filter. (part number:  CPICFIL03).

  • Visually inspect all hoses and cables in the E-chains.

  • Clean outside of unit frame and body of programmer sites with All-Purpose cleaner to remove dirt and debris.

Semi-Annually – 150 minutes

  • Perform complete BPM site diagnostics.

  • Inspect for loose hardware: brackets, bolts, and screws.

  • Inspect the 2 spring plungers on each T-post for wear. Adjust or replace as necessary.

  • Inspect X and Y-axis rails for signs of wear or accumulations of grease and dirt.

  • Grease all axes with Lithium grease.

  • Clean laser chamber of ash and debris.

  • Clean laser galvo lens.

  • Calibrate laser marking nozzles to laser marker.

  • Perform alignment camera to nozzle coplanar calibration.

Annually – 150 minutes

 

A BPM Microsystems certified Field Service Engineer can provide annual

maintenance. For more details or to schedule an annual maintenance

visit, then please contact your local sales office or service engineer.

Weekly – 10 minutes

  • Dust off programmer sites and socket modules with clean, dry compressed air.

  • Inspect Z-rod bellows for proper movement (compression and extension).

  • Check nozzle runout. Replace bellows if run-out is greater than 8 mils.

  • Remove debris from work area.

Monthly – 30 minutes

  • Vacuum fan filters on the back panel.

  • Vacuum computer air filter.

  • Inspect all moving parts for signs of excessive wear.

Quarterly – 30 minutes

  • Clean X and Y-axis gold encoder scales with non-abrasive, lint-free wipes using isopropyl alcohol. Do not use acetone, chlorinated solvents, or Methylated spirits.

  • Clean the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera lens using the Normal Cleaning Procedure. To remove fingerprints or other oily deposits, use the Cleaning Procedure for Persistent Problems.

  • Clean glass lens under laser pointer inside vacuum chamber.

  • Check X and Y Belt tension.

  • Inspect X and Y-axis rails for signs of wear or binding.

  • Inspect compressed air filter in pneumatics box located on the side of the machine.

  • Replace laser carbon filter (part number:  W4100FILTER) located under laser box bay. Adjust inspection intervals depending on usage.

  • Inspect laser HEPA filter (replace if needed).

  • Inspect vibratory feeder springs for signs of wear or damage.

  • Clean tape loader heat sealer shoes and/or pressure sealer rollers.

Semi-Annually – 60 minutes

  • Perform complete BPM site diagnostics.

  • Clean socket modules of dust and debris with clean, dry, compressed air.

  • Replace in-line vacuum filter located on the Pick-and-Place assembly.

  • Inspect for loose hardware: brackets, bolts, screws.

  • Clean laser box of ash and debris.

  • Clean laser galvo lens.

  • Calibrate laser marking nozzles to laser marker.

  • Perform alignment camera to nozzle coplanar calibration.

Annually – 90 minutes 

  • Perform all checks as Semi-Annually above.

  • Perform calibration verification procedure on programming sites.

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim:

Angle limit exceeded. The angle exceeded specified angle limit before a minimum was detected. Check pre-rotation, angle limit, and/or component height.

Basically, when a device has been picked and moved to the laser line in the CyberOptics, the measured width of the device has been calculated and an angle defined.  This dimension has equated to the wrong angle, essentially making the system think that the device is not rotated correctly.

Things to check:

  • Package dimensions especially alignment offset.
    Physically measure the device with digital calipers and compare against the the calculated package dimensions.  Ensure that the alignment offset is not too large else the device could be to high or low in the laser line and thus the wrong size measured.
  • Camera alignment.Run Cyberview Utility and ensure that the waveform is correct.
  • Z-bellows.
    Ensure that runout is below 10mils, the lower the better.
  • Z motion control system.
    Ensure that Z axis motor is not grinding, that the Z axis belt is at the correct tension, that the Z axis moves smoothly in all directions of travel.
  • Theta motion control system. 
    Run W axis motion drift test. 

You can also get this error if the Pnp nozzle to laser align camera is not coplanar, if the laser align camera is dirty, or if the incorrect nozzle is used.

If 4000 series, may need new theta cable D04241PD. 

Device Package Dimensions

The CyberOptics laser alignment camera is the heart of the vision centering system and you will need to specify the dimensions of your device. A library of package types comes with the BPWin software. The settings for a package can be edited. The dimensions of the device are stored under a package type name for future jobs. 

Using Auto Measure 

If the interlock(s) are opened during the auto measure process, the process will be aborted to avoid discrepancies when measuring the component. The following illustrates using the auto measure utility on a BP-4000 series Autohandler to measure a TSOP48 package.

  1. Open the Select Location to Teach dialog and select the package.
  2. Click the Teach button to display the package type dialog.
  3. Click on the Auto Measure button to start the utility. You will be presented with the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog to help assist in learning the location of the device. Use the arrows to position the nozzle as close to the center of the device then click the OK button to auto-learn the location of the device.
  4. After the location has been taught, you will be presented with a Package Auto Measure Utility dialog. The stages after teaching the device location can be lengthy depending on the thickness of the device. An Abort button is provided to allow you to terminate the entire process and place the device back in its original orientation.
  5. After the process is completed the package settings will have been updated. You will see a completion notification dialog.
  6. Click the OK button to complete the process and review the changes in the package type dialog put in by the utility.
Note:  If the longest length is within 1% of the narrowest length, then the utility will consider the package to be square and will set both lengths equal to the narrowest length.

More information about this feature can be found in the Automated Package Measure Utility FAQ.

 

Manually Editing 

The contents in the Select Location to Teach dialog are imported from what was entered in the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog.

  1. Select the package type (ex: TSOP32) you specified on the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog and click on the Teach button. The package type dialog appears on the screen.
  2. Populate the following the fields in the Device Package Dimensions section according to the manufacturer's data or specification sheets:
    1. Device thickness, including any leads - enter the thickness of the device with the inclusion of any leads. Cyberoptic laser align sensor requires this information to align the device properly.
    2. Device narrowest length, including any leads - enter the narrowest length of the device with the inclusion of any leads.
    3. Device longest length, including any leads - enter the longest length of the device with the inclusion of any leads.
    4. Equal Lengths - select the checkbox to designate if the narrowest and longest lengths should be equal.

Pin Numbering Style

Choose how pin 1 is determined on the package. The style selected here will show how pin 1 is oriented on the package in the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog when an input or output location is selected for teaching.

  • SOIC, TSOP, µBGA - Select this option to represent an SOIC, TSOP, or uBGA package style. This type of package style will display the pin one location at a corner of the package in the Adjust Nozzle Position dialog and it will also display the "'reverse" pin one location in the same dialog.
  • PLCC (centered pin 1) - Select this option to represent a PLCC package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a center of the package.
  • QFP (corner pin 1) - Select this option to represent a QFP package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a corner of the package.
  • DIP - Select this option to represent a DIP package style. This type of package style will have pin one located at a corner of the package. If this package's diagonal maxima exceeds 1055 mils (2.6797 mm) and vision centering is enabled then a warning message to disable vision centering, as illustrated in Figure A, will be presented when the OK button is selected.

VSP Nozzle Obstruction Detection

Note:  This section is available only on 4000-series APSs when the package dimensions meet the criteria for Very Small Package (VSP).

By measuring the change in vacuum to detect an obstruction the PnP can know when to begin raising the nozzle with the device attached when performing a pick operation. On the smallest devices pick errors may occur because this change is smaller than with larger devices. To account for this you can adjust the value used to determine when the nozzle has been obstructed. You should only adjust this value if you notice an unusual number of pick errors with VSP devices during a job session.

 

To adjust this value, follow these steps:

  1. Ensure the nozzle is currently unobstructed with no device attached.
  2. Click the "Vacuum" button. This will turn on the vacuum and enable the adjustment slider and the obstruction indicator.
  3. Place a device on the nozzle.  Obstruction detection is indicated below the slider.
  4. Using the slider, adjust the value as appropriate. Decreasing the adjustment percentage will cause the system to use a value that's closer to the unobstructed value while increasing the percentage will use a value that is further.
Note: The variation in vacuum pressure may cause the system to read values that never change the behavior of the obstruction indicator. The indicator is present only as a guideline and ultimately the adjustment value should be determined based on the performance of pick operations during a job session.

The adjustment percentage value is saved along with all other package parameters for future jobs.

This test should be used to ensure that the Pick-and-Place nozzle is installed properly and that the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera will accurately measure a device during placement. A large runout can cause the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera to incorrectly measure a device during placement and therefore misplace the device. The test is automatically run at initialization and at the beginning of the job.

The horizontal variation of the Pick-and-Place nozzle is measured from the perspective of the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera.

nozzle-runout

The CyberOptics Laser Align Camera captures images of the Pick-and-Place nozzle while the Pick-and-Place nozzle is rotated 360 degrees. This measurement is reported in mils (thousands of an inch; 1 mil = 25.4 µm). 

After the horizontal variation is measured, the Pick-and-Place nozzle is adjusted for best alignment with the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera by rotating the Pick-and-Place nozzle so that it is positioned in the center of the horizontal variation.

The Pick-and-Place nozzle runout affects the performance of a device pick, device measurement, and device placement operations. For example, a large Pick-and-Place nozzle runout can cause the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera to incorrectly measure a device as illustrated below.

nozzle-runout-incorrect

 

Because the measured center of the device is incorrect, the accuracy of device placement will be compromised. This large Pick-and-Place nozzle runout can also affect the pick performance of a device by creating a vacuum leak between the Pick-and-Place nozzle and the contact surface of the device. This vacuum leak will produce mis-picks or will reduce the DPH because a vacuum seal between the Pick-and-Place nozzle and the contact surface of the device will be delayed until the Pick-and-Place nozzle is retracted. This pick performance problem becomes more apparent when using very small packages due to the small contact surface of the package. Therefore it is recommended that the Pick-and-Place nozzle have a measured runout close to zero for optimal device pick, device measurement, and device placement performance during a job session or a station teach session.

Before a job session or a station teach session, BPWin will verify that the measured runout is within a recommended maximum runout for the selected package. If the measured runout exceeds the recommended maximum runout for the selected package, you will be presented with the option to continue using the Pick-and-Place nozzle with the large measured runout or cancel the current operation to correct the problem.  Note that the recommended maximum runout is defined as a runout that can be tolerated by the Pick-and-Place subsystem but will result in suboptimal performance.

BPWin will also verify that the nozzle is of an appropriate size for the selected package.

 

If you are experiencing issues with obtaining communication via USB to your TS1500 tray Stacker, then please read the following information.

You need to ensure that the driver is correct and that you have only one instance of DUB-E100 listed in Windows Device Manager.

Unplug the USB cable from the back of the stacker, you will need to remove the access panel located at the tray input position to get access.  Power the entire machine down and remove the stackers' left side upper and lower covers.
Attached to the inside of the lower cover is the Ethernet adapter. Note the revision of the adapter: a barcode label that says S/N: xxxxxxxxxx H/W: A1, would be adapter revision A1. Other possibilities are A2, A3 and B. Understand that the USB cable that plugs into the adapter, can also disconnect from the inside of the stacker if you need to replace the cable. Note also that the network cable between the adapter and the Galil board is a crossover cable, (p/n: CCABCAT5CROSS) After connections are made, and before closing the stacker, power up and see what messages are displayed.

If XP asks for drivers, use the driver CD-ROM that came with the adapter. After the drivers are installed, set the IP address as per the instructions in the TS1500 Users Guide which can be found in BPWin Help. After setting the IP address, go to Device Manager and ensure that the DUB-E100 adapter is present and working properly. Start BPWin and verify that TS1500 is detected after the Serial Peripheral Scan completes. 

Remove the TS1500 Ethernet Adapter and note the hardware revision printed on the label. It will be something like A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, etc.
Go to C:\Program Files\BP Microsystems\BPWin V5.xx.x (latest)\Drivers\NIC
Notice that there are 4 different driver ZIP folders, each specific for the particular ethernet adapter hardware version. Make the proper selection and copy it to a different folder (one that will not be deleted when BPWin is installed or uninstalled) Unzip the folder to access the drivers. 
Go to Hardware Manager and inspect the Network Adapters. One should be called DUB-E100. Right click and select Update Driver, pointing to the driver folder above.
Then go to Control Panel\Network Connections and right click on the DUB-E100 for Properties and check the IP address of the TCP-IP protocol: 
192.168.100.100
255.255.255.0
Start BPWin and see if the TS1500 is recognized.

Note: In Device Manager, if there is more than one instance of DUB-E100 adapters, e.g. #2, #3, etc., this is a problem that has no simple solution. These multiple instances can be caused by repeated unplugging and plugging of the USB cable, so this action should be avoided.
You can try uninstalling these additional instances, however it should be noted that sometimes Windows will not successfully remove them properly.  Attempts can be made to remove the corresponding key or word from the registry, but extreme caution should be taken before attempting any registry changes.  Make a backup first!!!
Worse case is a reformat of the C: drive to "clean the slate", install new OS, BPWin and install the drivers fresh.

If there is still an issue, please send a log file and error description once the issue occurs for further assistance.

The following is a list of common error codes which are either reported by BPWin or appear in the BlackBox files.

Error code 5

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states that communication from the Cyber interface controller to the laser has been interrupted.
This usually means that the coax cable is loose, check the connections to the Cyberoptics Laser attached to the head of the handler and also to the Cyberoptics Controller found behind the lower right panel at the front of the machine.


Error code 64

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim: Laser align did not detect a component. Check for component presence and check component position. Check the Alignment Offset value. Could also be a corrupted package file. Delete and create a new file from scratch.
Use the Cyberview utility and manually move the device into the laser and ensure that the waveform changes.

Error code 67

(See also error code 93. )
Check J2 DIPS on the SCM board. SW8 may have been accidentally knocked to the down position. 
If 4000 series, may need new theta cable D04241PD. 
If 3000 series, check the WCAB31LAENC cable, especially the crimp pins.
If 3000 series, check the motherboard for a missing jumper.
Possible weak vacuum, device slipping on the nozzle.

Error code 70

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim:

"Algorithm Error" - "The firmware detected a state that should never happen for the highest current error level. Verify that another error is not being hidden by error code mapping for lower error levels; make sure Laser Align is running at the highest error level the firmware version will support. If the problem persists, call CyberOptics for assistance."

BPWin sets the error code reporting for the Cyber controller to the highest level so that ALL errors will be reported by the controller. The error is occurring inside of the controller which could be caused, in my opinion, by a faulty power supply or a faulty Cyber interface controller.

Error code 90

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim:

"Too Few Frames" - "This is a firmware failure. Check component orientation. If the problem persists, contact CyberOptics for assistance."

The controller takes snapshots of the device as it is rotating. Each snapshot is considered a frame of information. The controller determines how many frames it will capture to determine the orientation of the device, etc...
In my opinion, this could possibly be caused because power to the controller is interrupted.

The BpWin code now represents the Cyber error code documentation. When a critical error occurs, the automated programming system will be stopped so that the problem can be corrected. Allowing the aps to continue by ignoring the critical error code will result in undefined behaviour. It may work or it may not work.

Together, we need to determine the root cause of the problems above instead of placing 'bandades' over them. If hardware is the cause then replace the offending hardware. If software is the cause then reproduce the problem consistently to help engineering implement the appropriate fix.

Error code 93

Symptom: BPWin handler will teach a location, but will fail when running the job.
The unshielded coax cable picks up noise from the motor power cable in the e-chain and delivers a dirty signal to the Cyber driver board. Slowing Theta will prove this.

Solution: Install 3 jumpers on the Cyber driver board to activate pull-up resistors.
If error 93 and 67 in conjunction, check for dirty Z encoder.
If 4000 series, needs new theta cable D04241PD.

Error code 95

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim: No cutoff 2. This is a firmware failure. Contact Cyberoptics for assistance
Things to check - Package dimensions especially the alignment offset. Camera alignment. Z-bellows, Z encoder, Z motion control system. 

Error code 98

According to the Cyber documentation, this error code states verbatim: Angle limit exceeded. The angle exceeded specified angle limit before a minimum was detected. Check pre-rotation, angle limit, and/or component height.
Things to check - Package dimensions especially alignment offset. Camera alignment. Z-bellows, Z encoder, Z motion control system. Theta motion control system. You can also get this error if the Pnp nozzle to laser align camera is not coplanar, if the laser align camera is dirty, or if the incorrect nozzle is used.
If 4000 series, may need new theta cable D04241PD. 

Over time, the need to increase device sizes and thus socket pins counts has increased, with this, some sockets require higher forces to fully open sockets.  On manual systems this is not too much of a problem as the operator manually opens the sockets, however, on automated sockets this can cause problems by premature failing of stepper motors and sockets not opening fully.

 

As a result, BPM provide upgrade options to improve the strength and reliability in two ways.

  1. The development of a simple stepper driver upgrade route
    Automated programming sites contain 1 stepper driver board to power both steppers.
  2. The development of the S class programming site
    Automated programming sites contain 2 stepper driver boards, one for each of the higher torque steppers.

Option 1 is a quick, simple and cost effective solution in most case, whilst Option 2 provides a more long term solution but requires more rework making it a return to base upgrade with a higher associated cost than Option 1.

Option 1 can also be carried out by competent production engineers in a matter of minutes, without the need to use a field engineer or return equipment for rework.  Full instructions are provided with each upgrade, which includes an upgraded Stepper Driver Card, additional power cable and cable ties.

So if you are experiencing issues with sockets not opening correctly then please contact your local Adaptsys sales or service engineer to discuss the purchase of a 7th Gen Stepper Motor Driver Upgrade.  It would be useful to specify the revision of the stepper driver board that is currently used on your site, which can be found on the underside of the Stepper Driver PCB which is the board with two connections to it, from the stepper motors.

The part should be WWAVSTEPxxx

If you use BPWin V5.24 and above and have issue running your laser then check the attachmemt

Teaching the label presenter location is more of a challenge in comparison to teaching other pick and place locations as it requires that the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis to be manually taught.  

Typically, a label would be too thin to be measured with the CyberOptics vision centering system, so you will have to manually locate the center of the label using the laser pointer on a 3000 series autohandler or the downward vision camera on a 4000 series autohandler.

It is important to understand that the accuracy of the Z-axis teach location will affect the performance of the pick operation on the label.  With a normal part, if the Z-axis teach location is a little high then the Pick-and-Place nozzle can still suck the part up when the vacuum is on, however, if the Z-axis teach is a little high for the labels, it will fail to pick the label as the label will have downward resistance due to the adhesive bond with the backing tape.

Conversely if the Z-axis teach location is too low, then the Pick-and-Place nozzle will overdrive the label causing the label to be compressed on to the backing making it increasingly difficult to remove and again result in a pick failure.

It is preferable to manually teach the Z-axis location using the Z-axis control described in manually teach the Z-axis position.  This will allow you to precisely position the Pick-and-Place nozzle on top of the label and then record the position as the learned Z-axis location.

Note:  Using the Auto Learn Z-axis feature to learn the Z-axis location will learn the location too high and introduce pick failures when picking a label.  This is because labels are prone to be "lifted" by the vacuum of the Pick-and-Place nozzle. 

  1. Make the appropriate entries in the Autohandler Workflow Settings dialog to teach.
  2. Select Autohandler > Teach... from the pull-down menu. The Select Location to Teach dialog appears on the screen.
  3. Select the LABELPRESENTER name.
  4. Click the Teach button.
  5. Select the Pin 1 radio button from Figure A or B to designate the orientation of pin 1 on the label to properly orient the label to the device.
    Orienting the Label using Label Presenter provides more information on determining the selection.
  6. Use the directional arrow buttons to position the Pick-and-Place nozzle over the center of the label.
  7. Teach the Z-axis location using the Z-axis control described in To manually teach the Z-axis position.
  8. Click OK.
Note:  Marking a center point on the label to teach will aid in label placement accuracy.

 

Label Thickness

When a label is attached to the device, the device becomes slightly thicker.  This can cause alignment problems with the Laser Align Camera.  Entering the label thickness will allow the software to adjust the alignment offset.

 

label-teach

 

Label Orientation

This section provides helpful information in setting up the Label Presenter settings for proper label orientation on the device.

The key to correctly orienting the label is to remember that BPWin will match the pin 1 designation on the label to the pin 1 designation of the site. Whatever edge or corner of the label to be placed near pin 1 is the radio button to be selected.

Examples:

The examples provided below show what radio button to select for different label placements. The orientation of the devices and labels pictured below is how it would appear standing at the front of the handler. Screenshots are from the Nozzle Adjust Position: LABELPRESENTER dialog. These examples can be adapted to your unique set-up. 

TSOP and Label A

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device, click on the lower or upper left radio button in Fig. B. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tsop label a-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device, click on the lower or upper right radio button in Fig. B. The label will not be turned.

tsop label a-3

 

TSOP and Label B

To place the "L" nearest pin 1, click on the lower or upper right radio button in Fig. B. The label will not be turned.

tsop label b-l

To place the "3" nearest pin 1, click on the lower or upper left radio button in Fig. B. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tsop label b-3

 

TSOP and Label C

To place the "L" nearest pin 1, click on the upper left or right radio button in Fig. A. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tsop label c-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1, click on the lower left or right radio button in Fig. A. The label will be turned -90 degrees.

tsop label c-3

 

TQFP and Label A

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the upper left radio button. The label will not be turned.

tqfp label a-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the lower right radio button. The label will be turned 180 degrees.

tqfp label a-3

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with vertical placement, click on the lower left radio button. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tqfp label a-lv

 

TQFP and Label C

To place the "L" nearest pin 1 on the device with vertical placement, click on the upper left radio button. The label will not be turned.

tqfp label c-l

 

To place the "3" nearest pin 1 on the device with horizontal placement, click on the lower left radio button. The label will be turned 90 degrees.

tqfp label c-3

 

locations

 

 

 

Symptoms

When the nozzle goes down to place a device into a socket or other location, the device remains on the nozzle.

As the nozzle returns to the Z home position, the device will then fall of the nozzle.

This issue can occur when changing jobs from large devices, which rely on gravity to assist them coming off the nozzle and small devices which need to be blown of the nozzle.

On occasion this can happen quickly and look like a placement issue.

Checks

  1. Check the main air input regulator, it should be in the region of 80psi.
  2. Check the puff off regulator, located behind the air regulator panel on the back of the system.
  3. Operate the I/O settings for vacuum and switch it on and off, with your finger over the nozzle.  Can you feel the vacuum drop off quickly when switched of, or is a slow release of pressure?  If it is slow, then there is insufficient or no puff off.
  4. Remove the puff off line to the MAC Valve, this is a thin clear pip on the head assembly.  Switch on the vacuum, can you feel air blowing out of this pipe?  
    If yes, then puff off air is present.  Replace this airline and move to step 5
    if no, there could be a leak or a kink in the pip in the echain.  Check the output from the puff off regulator.
  5. Remove the thin clear pipe from the MAC Valve, which has the T Piece and connects to the blue inline filter (if fitted!!).  Switch the vacuum on and off, can you feel the puff off?  
    If not, then the MAC Valve is faulty, check and replace.
    If yes, then replace the pipe and move to step 6.
  6. Remove the clear pipe which attaches to the Z Spline.  Switch Vacuum on and off, can you feel it on the pipe?
    If no, then the blue inline filter maybe blocked, try removing it and test again.
    If yes, then there could be a leak on the spline, check and adjust.
    I

The Y-axis is the short, front/back axis. Also called the lower axis. (Note: For old DOS systems, this would be the "X" axis) 

The time-out error message is received because the Y motor drive system did not get to the commanded encoder position within a certain time period.  This is usually caused by excessive slop in the Y drive system. Imagine that the Y-axis was commanded to go to Y encoder position 35803. The axis moves there, but overshoots a little. The motor reverses direction and moves, but again overshoots, the motor reverses again, moves, doesn't get there, moves again and then over shoots. Finally, the motion time period expires, the encoder is not at the desired location, so the error is displayed.  You can imagine that if the Y belt was loose, and the Y motor turns a fraction of 1 degree, all this does is take up slack, and the encoder never changes position. The solution is to find the source of the slack/slop and correct it.

 

  1. The first item to check is the belt. Unfortunately, there is no measurement tool to determine proper belt tension. Common sense should dictate the tension, but as a simple test, pinch the belt in the middle, and using moderated force, push and pull on the belt and the movement should be no more than about 1 inch. The Y idler assembly is at the front of the belt, and the motor is at the back. Two screws will loosen the Y idler assembly. (Note: the bottom screw acts as the hinge, and the upper screw is in a slot for adjustment.) Use a large, flat screwdriver as a lever on the Y idler body to achieve belt tension. When the tension is sufficient, tighten the 2 screws to secure the Idler assembly in position. Note: If the belt is too tight, it will wear out the idler bearings faster, too loose and the slop will continue to cause motion errors.
  2. While the belt is loose, check the idler assembly. There are two bearings on the idler shaft and these bearings can wear out. Spinning the pulley by hand, it should feel smooth. If the motion feels rough, replace the Y idler assembly. Note whether the idler housing is silver (3/8" shaft) or black (1/2" shaft). The new style black, 1/2" shaft idler assembly is p/n: CPICQUADIDLX.50 
  3. The belt itself can wear out. Check for the presence of rubber dust around either the Y motor pulley or the Y idler pulley.  Presence of black power dust is a good indication that the teeth of the belt are wearing down. This wear translates to slop between the belt and the pulley, especially on the motor pulley. This slop will cause Y motion time-out errors. Belt p/n: CPICBELTXY
  4. The Y motor is heavy duty and rarely wears out. However the pulley on the motor shaft can become loose. Check the two screws on the Y Motor pulley clamp for tightness. Even a tiny amount of movement can cause problems. The motor can become defective in two ways, electrically or mechanically. Unplug the motor and measure the resistance between pins 1 and 2 (winding A). Then measure the resistance between pins 3 and 4 (winding B). These resistance values must match exactly. (the actual value is not important) If they do not match, assume that some internal windings have shorted and replace the motor. Mechanically, it is impossible to determine the condition of the motor bearings by hand. Replacing the motor is the only sure way to rule a bad motor out. 

    Y Motor p/n: WPICMOT07
    Y Motor and Pulley Assembly p/n: D04065AD.
  5. The Y belt attaches to the head assembly by a belt clamp. Check this clamp for tightness.
  6. Swap the X and Y motor driver cards.  The DIP switch and Jumpers should be set the same, and are directly interchangable. Driver board p/n: WPICBRD04-XY
  7. The Y encoder is located behind (right side) of the head. To access the Y encoder, remove the right side plexiglass panel if a laser is not present. The laser marking option may need to be removed to gain access to the Y encoder. The encoder has a tri-state LED, which can change from green to yellow to red. The LED should be green throughout the entire range of travel. Often times there can be a build up of dust and lint between the encoder eye and the gold encoder strip. Remove the encoder and remove any contaminants using a swab and isopropyl alcohol. Make sure the lens is perfectly clean. Do not unplug the encoder with the machine powered on. This can blow the encoder’s op-amp. Reinstall the encoder and adjust as necessary to achieve the green LED for the complete range of motion. Adjustment is done by manually moving the encoder until the LED is green, tightening the two mounting screws, and checking that the LED stays green when moving the head manually throughout the travel. Y Encoder p/n: WENCRDHD02
  8. Check the encoder gold strip for scratches, cuts, finger prints, oil, etc.  Clean with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth. The scale can have damage if the encoder LED changes from green at a particular location, and cleaning does not correct the condition. The gold scale can be damaged if the encoder body is allowed to contact and rub on the gold scale. If the gold scale is damaged replace with p/n: WENC4XBR.

 

 

Following this procedure should solve Y motion timeout errors. If not, contact BPM technical support.

 

 

 

The X-axis is the long, left/right axis. Also called the upper axis. (Note: For old DOS systems, this would be the "Y" axis) 

The time-out error message is received because the X motor drive system did not get to the encoder position within a certain time period.  This is usually caused by excessive slop in the X drive system. Imagine that the X-axis was commanded to go to X encoder position 35803. The axis moves there but overshoots a little. The motor reverses direction and moves, but again overshoots, the motor reverses again, moves, doesn't get there, moves again and then over shoots. Finally, the motion time period expires, the encoder is not at the desired location, so the error is displayed.  You can imagine that if the X belt was loose, and the X motor turns a fraction of 1 degree, all this does is take up slack, and the encoder never changes position. The solution is to find the source of the slack/slop and correct it.

 

  1. The first item to check is the belt. Unfortunately, there is no measurement tool to determine proper belt tension. Common sense should dictate the tension, but as a simple test, pinch the belt in the middle, and using moderated force, push and pull on the belt and the movement should be no more than about 1 inch. The X idler assembly is on the left side of the belt, and the motor is on the right side.  Four screws will loosen the X motor plate (Note: loosen the bolts that hold the motor plate to the cross beam, not the bolts that hold the motor to the motor plate.) There is a small tensioning screw and nut assembly, between the X motor plate and the Cross beam. Unscrew the nut and the motor will slide to the left, releasing tension. To tighten the belt, the nut must be tightened to force the motor plate to the right. (Note: the tensioning screw must be held stationary while the nut is turned) When the tension is sufficient, tighten the 4 screws to secure the motor plate to the cross beam. Note: If the belt is too tight, it will wear out the idler bearings faster.
  2. While the belt is loose, check the idler assembly. There are two bearings on the idler shaft and these bearings, especially the lower, can wear out. Spinning the pulley by hand, it should feel smooth. If the motion feels rough, replace the X idler assembly. Note whether the idler housing is silver (3/8" shaft) or black (1/2" shaft).
  3. The belt itself can wear out. Note the presence of rubber dust around either the X motor pulley or the X idler pulley.  Presence of black power dust is a good indication that the teeth of the belt are wearing down. This wear translates to slop between the belt and the pulley, especially on the motor pulley. This slop will cause X motion time-out errors.
  4. The X motor is heavy duty and rarely wears out. However the pulley on the motor shaft can become loose. Check the two screws on the pulley clamp for tightness. Even a tiny amount of movement can cause problems. The motor can become defective in two ways, electrically or mechanically. Unplug the motor and measure the resistance between pins 1 and 2 (winding A). Then measure the resistance between pins 3 and 4 (winding B). These resistance values must match exactly. (the actual value is not important) If they do not, assume that some internal windings have shorted and replace the motor. Mechanically, it is impossible to determine the condition of the motor bearings by hand. Replacing the motor is the only sure way to rule a bad motor out. 
  5. The X belt attaches to the gantry/head assembly by a belt clamp. Check this clamp for tightness.
  6. Swap the X and Y motor driver cards.  The DIP switch and Jumpers should be set the same, and are directly interchangeable.
  7. The X encoder is located up on the gantry. To access the X encoder, remove the left side plexiglass panel and locate the two, black, mechanical stop blocks. Remove the left stop block.  The encoder has a tri-state LED, which can change from green to yellow to red. The LED should be green throughout the entire range of travel. Often times there can be a build up of dust and lint between the encoder eye and the gold encoder strip. Remove the encoder and remove any contaminants using a swab and isopropyl alcohol. Make sure the lens is clean. Do not unplug the encoder with the machine powered on. This can blow the encoder’s op-amp. Reinstall the encoder and adjust as necessary to achieve the green LED for the complete range of motion. Adjustment is done by manually moving the encoder until the LED is green, and then tightening the two mounting screws.
  8. Check the encoder gold strip for scratches, cuts, finger prints, oil, etc.  Clean with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth.

 

 

Following this procedure should solve the X motion time-out error. If not, contact BPM technical support.

 

 

Issue

BPWin software displays a message to indicate that there is no air pressure to the tray stacker.
A physical check of the air input regulators, air lines and connections shows that there is good air pressure going to Tray stacker.

The error message cannot be cleared and the tray stacker can't cycle trays with the software.

Resolution

The TS1500 Tray Stacker unit has an internal pressure sensor to indicate if compressed air is connected or not.
If the main system air pressure is enough, then the air pressure sensor might be set too high or is faulty. 

To adjust the pressure sensor, remove the Left Lower Panel. This will involve removing the Left Side Cover.
The pressure sensor is mounted on the Pneumatic Air Panel after the main air input supply’s “Y” connection and is visible in the attached images.

Feed a long flat head screw driver through the small hole in the base plate under the sensor and adjust the screw at the pressure sensor’s base. If your screw driver is not long enough, unbolt the pressure sensor while maintaining the air connection. Re-bolt if after you are done if needed.

Turn the dial full counterclockwise. Then turn it ¼ turn clockwise. If the correct air pressure is connected and power is on to the Tray Stacker, the sensor’s indicator red light will turn on. Do not try to exactly set the sensor based on the light to the pressure supplied as that might create problems.

 Please also refer to the TS1500 User Manual provided with the system or search the Help File in BPWin.

 

Issue

BPWin displays an error dialogue stating that the Tape Output is full.

Scenario

An automated programming job has been loaded, taught and run.
During the job, BPWin displays an error and the job will not run any further.

Cause

The TM330 controller has reached its STOP limit.

Background Information

The TM330 uses a combination of a STOP value and a COUNT value.
The STOP value is entered to specify how many parts should be taped for a particular batch.
The COUNT value displays the current number of parts that have been taped.

If you set the STOP value to 5000, then once the COUNT reaches 5000 then the TM330 enters in a Job Done condition.  This signal is detected by the BPWin software and displays the appropriate error message in the BPWin GUI.

Remedy

Use the TM330 controller functions to reset the STOP value.

  1. Press the ESC key on the membrane keypad to move to the controller settings.
  2. Press the 1 key, to access the COUNT setting.
  3. Press the 1 key, this resets the COUNT back to 0.
    Note: If you press the 2 key, you can enter a new STOP value.
  4. Press the ESC key.
  5. Press the 8 Key, to enter back into RUN mode
  6. Confirm that STOP value is correct.
  7. Confirm that the COUNT value is empty or 0.
  8. Continue/Restart your programming job.

 

 

 

Summary

Weak vacuum at the nozzle prevents location teach.

Details

The vacuum values on the I/O and Sensors Diagnostic dialog are a function of the vacuum transducer. If the vacuum is weak, the transducer will not change much, and these values will change little as well.

What is the reading on the vacuum gauge on the pneumatics panel? Less than 20 in/Hg is sign a problem. It could be a leak in the vacuum lines, a defective vacuum generator or vacuum valve. If the vacuum generator is good, go up to the head and pull the vacuum hose off the curved metal tube on the Z rod, and check the vacuum at the hose. If the vacuum is strong there, but weak at the nozzle, then the leak is inside the Z rod, probably the V-rings. If the vacuum is weak, the problem could be the in-line vacuum filter or the vacuum valve. Finally, there could be a split or cracked hose in the e-chain. 

bpm micro 4000 series vacuum faults    bpm micro 4000 series vacuum transducer     bpm micro 4000 series vacuum leaks     bpm micro 4000 series vacuum system

Summary

Weak vacuum at the nozzle prevents location teach.

Summary

If you suspect weak vacuum at the pick and place(PNP) nozzle, follow this procedure.

Check the input air regulator located inside the pneumatics box. The rightmost regulator should be set to 80 PSI. 
Next check the hoses and fittings on the vacuum generator inside the pneumatics box. 
In BPWin, go to Main Menu/Autohandler/Diagnostics/IO and Sensors, and turn on the vacuum. Go to the machine head assembly and put you finger on the end of the nozzle and monitor the vacuum value. The vacuum values on the I/O and Sensors Diagnostic dialog are a function of the vacuum switch. If the vacuum is weak, the switch will not trigger on. The vacuum voltage level must change more that 1.6 VDC to signify that a device is on the PNP nozzle. When this is achieved, the LED on the vacuum switch will turn on. The green LED on the IO and Sensors window will also turn on. 
Remove the vacuum hose from the fitting on the right side of the vacuum block and place your finger on the end of the hose. If the vacuum feels strong, then suspect a leak in the vacuum block assembly If the vacuum feels weak, then suspect a problem upstream of the vacuum block, for example the vacuum valve could be leaking or sticking, these could be a split or cracked hose in the e-chain or the vacuum generator is worn-out. 

The following diagrams show details about the pneumatic system, and details about the vacuum block. 

bpm micro 3000 series pneumatics system      bpm micro 3000 series vacuum block detail      bpm micro 3000 series vacuum switch      bpm micro 3000 series mac valve assemby

 

Summary

Checklist for successfully teaching and handling VSP Devices.

Details

Note that the BPM Microsystems specification sheet lists the SOT23 at 2.95 mm by 1.63 mm as the smallest device supported. Devices smaller than this will not be supported, or will require special setup techniques.

The following should be performed in this order to ensure success.

  1. Use the Correct Nozzle Tip.
    Use the smallest nozzle (part number: CPICNOZXG) and remove the O-Ring. 
  2. Check the Nozzle Tip for Burrs

    Inspect the nozzle tip under a microscope looking for machining burrs, or anything that would prevent the device from sealing completely on the nozzle tip. If metal burrs are found, use a procedure called lapping to remove them. Google 'lapping', or try these two links to get the idea:
    1. How to Lap a Heatsink Guide,
    2. Hone Lapping 101).

      The purpose is to ensure that the nozzle tip surface is perfectly parallel to the Cyberoptic camera. 
  3. Check the Z Bellows.
    The spring action of the Z bellows should be stiff. If the spring action is soft or loose, replace the Z bellows (part number: CPICROD01)
  4. Check the Nozzle Run-Out.
    Make sure that the nozzle run-out is 2 mils or less. Get the nozzle run-out as close to 0 as possible. The higher the run-out, the more teaching and handling problems there will be. Note: the run-out will be listed in the BPWin output window or can be found in the data log file at c:\bp\datalog\blackbox.html.
  5. Check the Camera to Nozzle Coplanarity Alignment.
    The alignment can get knocked out of tolerance during shipping. This should be checked regardless. Nozzle run-out will be critical at this point. Try to get the nozzle in the middle of the camera field. This will minimize side-to-side variations after coplanarity alignment.
    This is a link to a step-by-step procedure document: Camera to Nozzle Coplanar Alignment (link opens a new tab/window)
    The Camera Coplanarity alignment cannot be stressed enough! It must be done, and it must be done correctly!
  6. Check the Camera-to-Nozzle Offset.
    This is only applicable on the 4000 Series Autohandler. Incorrect values are amplified during VSP teaches. 
  7. Use the AutoMeasure Function.
    Run AutoMeasure to get a good Alignment Offset. The Alignment Offset may vary from machine to machine due to factors such as Z bellows spring compression, etc.
    This Alignment Offset is a good starting point. Tweaking may and probably will be necessary during a job. If the Alignment Offset is a value close to zero, or even a negative number, then the Z bellows is worn and must be replaced. (part number: CPICROD01) 
  8. Use the Manual Z Axis Control when teaching.
    This technique can also be used for AutoMeasure. In the Teach window, check the Z axis Control box to enable the manual Z control function. Drive the Z axis down while watching the nozzle tip to help set the Z height. For 3000 Series Autohandlers, this technique will achieve a much more accurate X and Y axis alignment than the laser pointer will allow. 

    bpm micro auto measure for very small parts bpm micro adjust nozzle position
  9. Check the Package Dimensions.
    Let AutoMeasure determine the length and width. These will be good starting points, but may need to be adjusted during a job session.
    Set the Pick-Up Offset value at about 15 mils. (mispicks may require changing the value to 20 mils.)
    Set the Placement Offset value at about -10 to -15. (misplacements would indicate that devices are dropping from too high a location, so reduce the value.)
    Set the Tolerance value at 5%. Lower values will increase alignment failures. Higher values may pass bent pins.
  10. Adjust Puff-Off
    Puff-off is critical. A smaller inner diameter nozzle will require a higher puff-off pressure to accomplish the same results. Too much puff-off could flip the device in the socket or even blow the device out of the socket. Too low a puff-off pressure will allow the device to "stick" to the nozzle, resulting in an accidental misplacement. It is misplacements like this that result in bent leads. A Puff-off change as little as 1 PSI can have a dramatic effect. Tip: Place the device on a white piece of paper on a tray platform or shuttle to simulate a socket teach. You will be able to see the device and nozzle clearly and can visually judge the results of puff-off settings.

Common error messages and issues that can be encountered during teach: 

Message: Failed to learn device location. 

Go to C:\BP\Data Log and open the BlackBox.html file. Scroll to the end of the file and find the error message. You can also search for the error message in the log file by using CTRL+F and typing the detail you would like to search. Typically the measurement will be out of tolerance of the length or width. The actual measured length or width will be displayed. Enter the measured value into the package teach window and try the teach again. In the log file, look for Cyber Status codes before the error. A Cyber Status code of 1 signifies a good measurement. Any code other than 1 is a problem code. Please refer to this pdf file for a list of the Cyberoptic codes: cyberoptics_laser_align_error_codes.pdf 

Contact BPM Microsystems Technical Support for further explanation of your specific code if further details or assistance is needed. 

 

Message: The Angle Limit was reached before a minimum width was detected, or the device slipped on the nozzle.
Check for Vacuum System Problems. Weak vacuum at the nozzle can allow the device to slip on the nozzle. Reference the following documents for low vacuum pressure issues:
3000 series: Vacuum pressure too low on 3000 Series APS
4000 series: Vacuum pressure too low on 4000 Series APS

Tape loader problems:
The TM50 can be used with either heat of pressure sealing. The TM300 can only be used with pressure sealing because the actuation of the heat sealer will cause the devices to jump out of the carrier tape. Use the slowest speed setting of 5 to minimize carrier tape jolting. We have also found that certain cover tapes can actually stick to the guide rods and cause devices to pop out of the carrier pockets. In some cases, it may be necessary to machine a cover plate out of ESD plexiglass to cover the tape loader track and open carrier tape to prevent placed devices from jumping out of the carrier tape pockets.

Summary

A detailed explanation of the Empty Socket Test Option. (NOTE: This option was removed from BPWin beginning with V5.5)

 

Details

During an automated programming system job run, there can be the occasional mis-picks or mis-placements of a device during handling.
The error message for a mis-pick is ALWAYS to manually remove the device and discard.
The error message for a mis-placement is ALWAYS to correct the device placement.

These erros are caused by factors such as poor operator training or aweness, or the operator can neglect to remove a mis-pick from a programming socket.
If this occurs, a double stack can occur in the socket.  If the devices are reprogrammable, then the bottom device is reprogrammed whilst the top device, which is still blank, gets moved to the output.

The Empty Socket Test was created just for this purpose - when the operator fails to do what is required. 

The value for this option will determine how often each programming site will perform a continuity test. We recommend a minimum value of 5. This means that after 5 programming cycles on each site, that site will perform a continuity test. The programming cycles can be passes or failures, and when every fifth device is removed, the site will perform a continuity test. If a device is detected in any socket, anytime throughout the job, the job will be terminated with an error message, stating that a device was detected in a socket that was supposed to be empty.

The logical urge is to set this value to 1 so that if a device is accidentally left in a socket, it will be detected quickly. Although this is true, there are some negative consequences with using a value of 1.
First, you will loose throughput. Devices per hour will decrease due to the added time is takes to perform the continuity test. This decrease can be substantial. 
Second, the site stepper motors will be worked twice as often, which will wear the motors out twice as fast. Replacing the motors require removing the sites, extended down time and site which is removed will require re-teaching.

The reason that we recommend a value of 5 (or 10) is to reduce the drop in devices per hour, and to save wear and tear on the site stepper motors.
Should a failure ever occur, simply rerun the programmed devices in Verify mode to find the blanks.

Again, this option was created to compensate for operator error.

This option works for all socket modules, including FX4.

Are you experieincing problems where programmed devices are being dropped inside the laser marker on a 3X system or BPWin is reporting that no device was found on one of the laser nozzle positions?

If so, here are some suggestions to check and confirm.

  • Has anyone seen the problem happen, as this will help understand what is happening?
  • Was the device still on the nozzle at that time of the BPWin error report?
  • Has the part fallen off the nozzle in to the laser?
  • Does the problem only happen on nozzle 1, or do you see it on nozzle 2.
  • Is the problem only happening on the laser positions or other places too.
  • Do you have to correct nozzle for the device.
  • Is the nozzle spin speed too fast, causing the part to fly off.

If this is only happening at nozzle 1 position have tests been done to make sure that suffecient vacuum is present on the nozzle to hold the device during marking, that there is no damage to the nozzle o ring, that no holes are present in the vaccum tubing.

As always, BB file for when the job was running of for when tests are carried out will always be useful to see what is exactly happening.

Summary 


Step-by-step guide on how to check and adjust the Camera to Nozzle Coplanar Alignment on 3x00 and 4x00 APS

Details

For the BPM Microsystems handlers to correctly and accurately measure and align devices for accurate placement, the nozzle must be aligned perfectly perpendicular to the plane of the Cyberoptic camera.

Tools needed: Set of SAE Hex wrenches, a TSOP device, a straight or new Z Bellows (CPICROD01), and a standard nozzle tip (CPICNOZ01), with a new o-ring (CPICORING01).

Start BPWin and check the nozzle runout (this can be found in the BPWin output window or current html log file at c:\bp\datalog\blackbox.html. The nozzle runout must be less than 2 mils for the most accurate alignment. Correct or replace the Z bellows/nozzle as necessary. 
Open the interlock and move the head forward so that accessing the nozzle will be easier.
Go to Autohandler/Diagnostics/CyberView. In the Cyberview dialog window, click the Capture button. 

CyberView Image

The Cyberoptic camera has an laser emitter on one side, and a detector on the other side. Each side also has a lens that must be kept clean as part of maintenance.
The blue squiggly line represents the Cyberoptic camera laser beam cast across the entire opening of the detector. The left side of the "window" is toward the back of the handler, the right side is toward the front. The height of the beam is a function of intensity. The scale on the right side shows that the unblocked laser beam is 150 units of intensity. The dip in the middle is the nozzle tip. It is casting a partial shadow. A full shadow would be indicated by an intensity of 0. At this point, the nozzle is at the home position, defined as where the nozzle tip just breaks the Cyberoptic beam. This diagram explains the Camera beam graphically:
Cyberview explained.PNG

Click the Vacuum On button, and place a TSOP (or large QFP) upside down on the nozzle. Square up the device to the Cyberoptic camera so that the longest side is facing and square to the lenses. This will cast the widest shadow.
If you click the Capture button now, you will see that the full width of the device will cast a complete shadow as in the following example.

CyberView Image with a part on the nozzle

Use the Z-axis Pick and Place Control to raise the nozzle until the bottom of the device can be seen. (Actually the top of the device, because it's on the nozzle upside down)
Enter a positive value, example: 10 mil in the Z-axis Relative Pos box, and click Move Up. Then capture. Move up more if necessary. Click capture. In the following example, the device was raised too high. 

CyberView Image with no part on the nozzle

Change the value from 10 to 2 mils and click Move Down to fine tune the Z position. Not that the Z-axis Position value changes as you move the nozzle up and down.
Keep trying until you can see the bottom of the device as in this example:

CyberView Image showing that the camera is not level

Nozzle is not perpendicular to the camera in the example above. If it were, the device's shadow would be horizontal, and not angled.
In the W-axis (Theta) Relative Pos box, enter 180 deg, and click Rotate CW (or Rotate CCW, the effect is the same). Click Capture again and see what the image looks like. You may need to fine tune the nozzle height again.
The resulting 180 deg. image will tell a story. If the device surface is still slanted, and is slanted in the same direction, then the camera is not coplanar, and needs to be shimmed. If the image is slanted but in the opposite direction then the Nozzle is probably bent. Replace the nozzle and try again. 

For the 3x00 APS system, adjustment is made by shimming the theta motor. 

  • IMG_5857.jpg 
  • IMG_5858.jpg 
  • IMG_5859.jpg

For the 4x00 APS System, adjustment is made by shimming the camera.

  • 4x00 Camera shims.JPG

The result of the shimming is to get the device image as close to horizontal as possible. The following images show good alignments.

CyberView Image showing good camera alignment

Although the following image is not completely horizontal, it is perfectly acceptable, good enough. The image should be good at both 0 and 180 deg.
CyberView Image showing alignment

When finished with the adjustment, remove the device from the nozzle, click the Vacuum Off button and then the Close button. The handler will initialize and home.
Because shimming will not significantly change the relative height of the Cyberoptic camera, reteaching is not required. No other calibration is necessary.

BPWin 4X series of automated device programmers, have the ability to have programmed parts placed directly into carrier tape and then sealed using the V-TEK TM50 or TM330 taping systems.

To increase the flexibility to handle output reels or programmed parts, BPWin has the ability to create Virtual Reels.

What Are Virtual Reels?

They can be defined as length of of carrier tape containing just a sub quantity of programmed parts from the total job requirement.

Imagine that you have to program 5000 devices, but need to have them on 5 reels of 1000.
This is a perfect scenario for Virtual Reels to be able to split the job in to the required amounts.

How Does It Work?

By using the latest version of BPWin, V5.14.0 and above, you can access the Virtual Reel functions via the Tape Loader Station settings, only available in Autohandler mode.

Essentially, you will only need to define how many parts you need per Virtual Reel, if you require the system to pause at the end of a Virtual Reel and specify either a number of pockets or distance that the tape should advance at the end of the Virtual Reel.

Depending on the chosen settings, the system will program devices and put them in to tape until the number of devices per Virtual Reel is reached at which time either an operator message will be displayed to prompt the the operator to continue or it will automatically advance the tape by the value set.  This process will continue until the total job count is reached.

How Do I Find The Parameters?

As of BPWin v5.32.1, the following details are correct.

Tape Loader Station Settings can be found below.

    • From the BPWin Menu: Autohandler->Tape Loader->Settings
    • In APS view, right click on any Tape Loader station then select the Settings menu option.
    • In Workflow Configuration, clcik on any Tape Loader media then select the Settings menu option.

BPWin Tape Loader Settings

Advance at start of job

When enabled, Tape Loader will advance one pocket when a job starts. This serves as an internal verification that the Tape Loader is functioning properly.

End of reel advance

The job session will present the reload notification when the end of the virtual reel is detected when this option is enabled. This has the effect of pausing the job session until the operator dismisses the reload notification. Unchecking this option will cause the job session to bypass the reload notification when the end of the virtual reel is detected and continue with the job session. This type of action is useful when unattended operation of the job session is desired when using the virtual reel.

Number of devices per virtual reel

Enter the number of devices that will signal a full virtual tape reel during a job session. A virtual tape reel is defined as a section of the physical tape media. When used with the 'End of reel advance' option, you can separate full virtual tape reels during a single job session.

Tape Options Wizard can be found below.

  • From the BPWin Menu: Autohandler->Teach
    When teaching a tape loader station, the Peripheral Selection dialog may appear if BPWin detects more than one of the station type selected. For example, if two tape loaders are connected to the automated programming system, the Peripheral Selection dialog will list both tape loaders. You must select the targeted tape loader that will be taught, then click OK to continue.
  • In APS view, right click on any Tape Loader station then select the Teach menu option.

BPWin Tape Options Wizard

  • Pitch - this value must match the value entered as the pitch on the VTEK unit. The range for this value is from 2mm to 144mm.
  • Speed - this value must match the value entered as the speed on the VTEK unit. The range for this value is from 5 to 250.
  • End of reel advance - this setting determines how many pockets to advance the tape when the end of reel is reached.
  • Specify as pockets - select this to enter the pocket count directly into the Tape Advance field.
  • Specify as distance - select this to enter the distance in mils or millimeters into the Tape Advance field. The distance type is based upon the System of Units selected.
  • Note: Since the tape loader unit is advanced using pocket counts, the entered distance will be converted into pocket counts.
  • Finish button - this button is greyed out 

For further information or assistance, please refer to the BPWin Help File, of contact your Adaptsys Support Engineer.

CyberOptics Camera Image Quality Test

This test should be used to ensure that the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera is functioning properly and clear of debris. The test is automatically run at initialization and at the beginning of the job.

Various image quality parameters are inspected on the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera to ensure that they are within maximum and minimum tolerances. If the camera does not meet these tolerances, the user will be presented with the CyberOptics Laser Align Camera cleaning procedures.

Cleaning Schedule

CyberOptics recommends cleaning the sensor windows once every three months. Under adverse conditions, it may be necessary to clean them more often. However, more frequent cleaning is discouraged due to the chance of damage to the windows from improper cleaning.

Normal Cleaning Procedure

Under normal operating conditions, dust and debris can accumulate on the Laser Align sensor windows. To remove this dust, CyberOptics recommends using one of the following procedures:

  • Blow the dust off the sensor windows using an airbrush or a can of pressurized air.

  • Brush the dust off the sensor windows using a camel-hair brush or a brush made of a material designed for cleaning optical surfaces.

Cleaning Procedure for Persistent Problems

Use the following procedure to remove fingerprints or other oily deposits that are not removed using normal cleaning procedures.

  • Moisten a lint-free tissue or cotton swab with a small amount of isopropyl alcohol.

  • Wipe each window once with the moistened tissue or swab in a single direction.
    IMPORTANT: Wiping back and forth may re-deposit the debris and may damage the window.

  • Using a dry tissue or swab, lightly wipe each window in a single direction to remove any remaining alcohol residue.

Summary

The purpose of this utility is to facilitate entering package dimensions that include:

  • Thickness of the package.

  • Narrowest length of the package.

  • Longest length of the package.

  • Alignment offset that will obtain the best measurements during a job session.

  • Alignment tolerance value based on the narrowest package dimension and common manufacturing variances.

For instructions on how to use the Automated Package Measure Utility, click here.

Theory of Operation

The utility uses the CyberOptics laser align camera to obtain measurements of the package thickness, narrowest length and longest length. The utility will also use the camera to acquire a package profile. The profile consists of “measurement slices” obtained starting from the top of the package and ending with the bottom of the package. This profile is then used to determine the alignment offset that will obtain the best package measurements during teaching and a job session. The accuracy of the utility is limited by the hardware and the package that is being measured.

Examples that may exaggerate inaccurate results are:

  • Bent leads on the package.

  • Damaged package.

  • Dirty CyberOptics laser align camera.

  • Large "runout" on the nozzle.

  • Using an incorrect nozzle size for the package.

  • The nozzle to laser align camera laser stripe is not at a right angle.

The auto measure process consists of multiple stages and is described below:

  1. Learning the location of the package.

  • The location is comprised of the X-axis and Y-axis coordinates, the Z-axis height of the package, and the package’s rotation orientation. This is necessary so that the package can be picked and then placed in its original orientation when the process has completed.

  • It is very important that the nozzle be as close to the center of the package as possible when teaching its location so that the utility may obtain the best results. If the nozzle is too close to the edge of the package, the utility may not be able to determine the top of the package accurately.

  1. Learning the top of the package.

  • The nozzle's spring will compress when vacuum is engaged and a package is attached to the nozzle. The amount of spring compression depends on the amount of wear to the nozzle. Because the spring compresses, the home position is not the top of the package. Therefore, the top of the package must be located with this stage of the process. A side effect of this stage is that the spring compression is recorded in the log file. This information can be used to determine when the nozzle will need to be replaced.

  1. Learning the narrowest length and longest length of the package.

  • During this stage, the package is rotated to determine the optimal pre-rotation orientation. The orientation will also provide that the narrow length of the package will be measured first by the laser align camera. According to CyberOptics laser align camera documentation, measuring the narrow length first results in a better measurement of the package.

  • According to CyberOptics documentation, the maximum package size that the camera can measure is a 30mm X 30mm package. Anything outside of this range will cause the utility to fail and to abort the process.

  1. Learning the bottom of the package to calculate its thickness.

  • A package can be too thick to be measured by an Autohandler. The user will be presented with an appropriate dialog if the package is too thick to be measured by an Autohandler.

  • The BP-4000 series Autohandler has a smaller package thickness range capability than the BP-3000 series Autohandler. Therefore, a thick package that is successfully measured by the BP-3000 series Autohandler may present a dialog on a BP-4000 series Autohandler.

  1. Scanning the entire package from top to bottom, every 2 thousandths of an inch, to obtain a package profile.

  • The alignment offset will be calculated with this profile.

  1. Learning the length of the package at the alignment offset.

  • The dimensions of a package must take into account the leads if leads are present. These values in conjunction with the set tolerance will provide the system the ability to determine if the package has a bent lead.

Programmers

With Immediate Effect.

BPM Microsystems announced in 2012 that they would no longer repair or calibrate any programmers with parallel ports, ahead of their End Of Life announcement.  
Please see these links: 
  • http://www3.bpmmicro.com/web/helpandsupport.nsf/WebKeys/BPM-8E3LVD?openDocument&Cat=Issue
  • http://www3.bpmmicro.com/web/helpandsupport.nsf/WebKeys/BPM-8NTSKL?openDocument&Cat=Issue
 
Adaptsys, as BPM authorised repair centre, have continued to support our customers for an additional 5 years, however, the time has now come for us to withdraw support for all further BPM/Actel programmers with parallel ports.
 
You will still be able to use your programmer, with the last version of the software you used, but we will no longer be able to provide any repair or calibration services for them.
 
If you wish to discuss upgrade paths, then please contact sales@adaptsys.com.

On 8th Generation programming sites, upto 4 sockets cards can be place per programming site.

With automated handlers, we employ stepper motors to pull down pressure plates to open and close the sockets and each device algo had code to establish to correct number of the steps that the motor must move to complete this function.

Although 1, 2, 3 or 4 sockets cards can be installed, the quantity and position has an affect on the correct opening and closing of the sockets, more importantly, incorrect setup can cause damage to the motors and/or socket cards themselves. 

3800 site configuration

Over time, the need to increase device sizes and thus socket pins counts has increased, with this, some sockets require higher forces to fully open sockets.  On manual systems this is not too much of a problem as the operator manually opens the sockets, however, on automated sockets this can cause problems by premature failing of stepper motors and sockets not opening fully.

 

As a result, BPM provide upgrade options to improve the strength and reliability in two ways.

  1. The development of a simple stepper driver upgrade route
    Automated programming sites contain 1 stepper driver board to power both steppers.
  2. The development of the S class programming site
    Automated programming sites contain 2 stepper driver boards, one for each of the higher torque steppers.

Option 1 is a quick, simple and cost effective solution in most case, whilst Option 2 provides a more long term solution but requires more rework making it a return to base upgrade with a higher associated cost than Option 1.

Option 1 can also be carried out by competent production engineers in a matter of minutes, without the need to use a field engineer or return equipment for rework.  Full instructions are provided with each upgrade, which includes an upgraded Stepper Driver Card, additional power cable and cable ties.

So if you are experiencing issues with sockets not opening correctly then please contact your local Adaptsys sales or service engineer to discuss the purchase of a 7th Gen Stepper Motor Driver Upgrade.  It would be useful to specify the revision of the stepper driver board that is currently used on your site, which can be found on the underside of the Stepper Driver PCB which is the board with two connections to it, from the stepper motors.

The part should be WWAVSTEPxxx

All BPM manual and automated programmers rely on the use of a single power supply, per site, to power the site up.

From time to time, it maybe necessary to adjust the PSU supply voltages, specifically if BPWin diagnostics fails or a voltage rail is out of specification.

The follow guides serves to explain how to adjust the power supplies voltage.

Due to the variations in power supplies in the field and identifation of the correct power supply for the site, the following section is split into manual and automated, with automated split into 3X and 4X series handlers.

Caution: Shock Hazard.
Please take due care when making voltage adjustments to the power supply as mains voltages in the region of 110V to 240V AC are present on this PCB.
The following should only be carried out my competent and trained staff.
We can take no liability or responsibility for and damage caused to equipment or personal.

Manual Programmers

Each single site manual programmer will have its own PSU installed.
In the case of 2, 4, 6 or 8 site programmers, then the corresponding number of PSUs will be installed.

Identify which programmer requires adjustment.

BPWin has a Power Supply test function under the Tools menu, which shows the PSU values read back from the currently selected master site.
In the case of multi site programmers, the master site number will need to be changed to the site that needs testing.

A suspect site can be on that fails voltage rails during diagnostics or shows very erratic voltage fluctuations. Look out for any voltage rail that has an Asterix (*) next to it.
Once the suspect site has been identified, power off the programmer and disconnect all cables to it.

Remove the 4 case screws, 2 front, 2 back and lift the top cover of the chassis, taking care to not strain the internal cables.

Identify the correct Power Supply to adjust.

On single site programmers this is easy as there is only one power supply installed.
On multisite programmers, simply follow the cables from the suspect site to its power supply.

At this stage, place the open programmer in such a way that it can be connected to the power cable and host PCs USB cable and so that you have safe access to the sites power supply, making sure that the top cover is stable and will not fall over.

Preparing to adjust the Power Supply.

At this stage, the programmer can now be turned on, taking care of the potential electric shock risk.

Once you have communications between BPWin and the programmer, run the Power Supply test again.

Refer to the Power Supply Adjustment

Once these are confirmed as set correctly, then power off, disconnect cable and reassemble.  Carry out one further power up, power supply and diagnostics test to verify.

 

If after this stage, you are still experiencing problems, then please submit a support request via our helpdesk, provide all the relevant information and BB files from your tests, so that we can check and advise on alternative solutions.

 

Automated Programmers

Each automated programmer will have its own PSU installed.
Even if you have an 11 site chassis with only 1, 2 or more sites installed, the E-Box will house a full set of power supplies.

Identify which programmer requires adjustment.

BPWin has a Power Supply test function under the Tools menu, which shows the PSU values read back from the currently selected master site.
In the case of multi site programmers, the master site number will need to be changed to the site that needs testing.

A suspect site can be on that fails voltage rails during diagnostics or shows very erratic voltage fluctuations. Look out for any voltage rail that has an Asterix (*) next to it. 
Once the suspect site has been identified, power off the programming sites via the switch on the front of the autohandler (4X) or completely power off in using a 3X autohandler

Identify the correct Power Supply to adjust.

There are two handler types, 3X and 4X and depending on the model, the location of the power supplies will vary.  Refer to the correct type below.

3X Handlers

You will need to remove the main, large front panel to the system to gain access to the E-Box.  The E-Box is the large silver coloured box on the bottom of the handler with all the Red and Black power cables coming out of it.

Remove all the bolts from the top cover to gain access to the power supplies.

Each power supply will be mounted and marked with the corresponding site number to aid identification.

Preparing to adjust the Power Supply.

At this stage, the system can now be turned on, taking care of the potential electric shock risk inside the E-Box.

Once you have communications between BPWin and the programmer, run the Power Supply test again.

Refer to the Power Supply Adjustment

Once these are confirmed as set correctly, then power off the system and reassemble. Carry out one further power up, power supply and diagnostics test to verify.

4X Handlers

You will need to remove the four fixing screws which hold the fascia of E-Box on the chassis, located on the left side, above the PC on the front of the system.  There will also be one smaller screw by the switches on the panel.

Each power supply will be mounted and marked with the corresponding site number to aid identification.

Preparing to adjust the Power Supply.

Carefully slide the correctly power supply out of the carrier to gain access to the blue potentiometers.

Take care as these power supplies as they are carrying mains voltage.

Refer to the Power Supply Adjustment

Once these are confirmed as set correctly, then slide the power supply back in and replace the cover.  Carry out one further power supply and diagnostics test to verify.

 

 

Power Supply Adjustment

For the old single pot Phiyong supply:
Ensure that the measurement reads 5.15VDC.
In the event that the measurement is out, adjust VR1 on the power supply to the correct value.

For the newer (large blue pots) dual pot supply:
Ensure that the measurement reads 5.15VDC and the 15v supply is at, or very close to, 16.50v.
If the supplies are not within specifications, then adjust R32 on the external power supply for the +5v. and adjust R31 to set the 15v supply.

For the newest (dual micro pots) dual pot supply:
Ensure that the measurement reads 5.15VDC and the 15v supply is at, or very close to 16.90 v.
If the supplies are not within specifications, then adjust the two micro pots on the external power supply for the +5v. and 15v supply.

Note: This supply requires a higher setting on the 15v output to prevent the +30v output from pulling too low (at least 16.80v). The recommended setting is between 16.90 and 17.00v .

 

If after this stage, you are still experiencing problems, then please submit a support request via our helpdesk, provide all the relevant information and BB files from your tests, so that we can check and advise on alternative solutions.

When using older versions of software and hardware, care must be taken to ensure that the DIP Switches (SW1) on the programming site motherboard are set so as not cause conflicts with duplicated settings.

The following image shows the DIP switch SW1.
The ON position (up) is binary 0, the OFF position (down) is binary 1
DIP Switches

The following table shows the correct DIP switch setting depending on the site number that is being set up.

Switch Number PositionSite Number
87654321
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 6
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 7
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 8
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 10
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 11

If you are experiencing communications problems, check to see if the USB 2.0 drivers are installed using the Device Manager setup.
In Windows Device Manager, verify that a BPM Microsystems Programmer Site exists for each programmer site that is attached and powered on.

Drivers are available on the CD ROM supplied with your equipment.

Any new site that is attached should automatically be detected by Windows too.

An option in BPWin Device Menu called VerifyCalibration maybe executed to allow
testing the accuracy of the internal DVM and time base using a bench DVM and
oscilloscope or period counter. We recommend that the following procedure be
performed every 12 months. The procedure may be performed in the field or at the
factory for a fee. If the unit fails the accuracy or the self-diagnostic tests, it must be
returned to the factory for repair and failure analysis.

Equipment required:

  • Digital Volt Meter (must be rated at 0.1% precision)
  • Oscilloscope

Procedures for verifying accuracy of internal DVM:

  1. Open BPWIN
  2. Install the FVE4SM32D in socket A of the master site
  3. Go to File Menu
  4. Select Configure
  5. Ensure 2800 series programmer is displayed click OK
  6. Go to Device Menu
  7. Select VerifyCalibration
  8. Dialog Box “Self Test Configuration” should open
    Note: “Loop mode" will be disabled
    • In this dialog box select the site to be tested and click OK
    • The self test will begin on the site selected
      • If self-test passes, the verifycal procedure will run.
      • If self-test does not pass, it will be skipped for this site, and self-test will begin running on the NEXT selected site. (if applicable)
  9. The VerifyCalibration procedure will do the following:
  10. If any failure occurs the verifycal operation will be aborted for the current site.
  11. The user is presented with a pop-up
    Using a calibrated oscilloscope and scope probe
    1. Connect the probe
    2. Measure the voltage at pins 1 and 2 of DIP socket and check that they fall within the minimum and maximum levels displayed on
    3. the screen.
    4. Click OK.

Procedures for verifying AC calibration:

At this point in the test, the programmer will produce a 1000us pulse width, which is 

generated on pin 2.
Using the oscilloscope verify that the positive pulse on pin one is
between 990us and 1010us.

  1. Click Close to continue
  2. If multiple programmer sites have been selected the self-test will start to run again on the next site, followed by the verifycal procedure described above.

Socket Modules

Question

How can I use BPWin API to read back the insert count of the installed socket modules?

Answer

BPWin API does provide insertion counts via "The SystemInformation XML document", which can be retrieved using the "GetSystemInfo" method as well as the "NotifyConfigurationUpdate" event, both of CJobMonitor.  

GetSysInfo

There is no current way to retrieve daughter card serial numbers, but a feature request for that functionality has been added.

Summary

Over the lifetime of a socket various factors can cause the socket performance to degrade. The purpose of this document is to detail preventative maintenance and cleaning methods recommended for various socket types. Adaptsys Support should be contacted if within the normal life cycle of a socket and after following these procedures, does not improve socket yield or if socket yields deteriorate rapidly early in the life of a socket. 

 

Details

Socket Categorization 

There are 3 basic types of sockets from a cleaning perspective.

  1. Elastomer based sockets. Elastomer sockets have a springy socket membrane at the base of the socket which forms a group of pads as opposed to individual pins. These are always compression mount sockets i.e. that they are mounted onto the PCB using screws or bolts.
  2. Pogo pin based sockets. As the name suggests Pogo pin based sockets use a pogo pin as the electrical contact (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_pin). Pogo pin based sockets are always compression mount sockets also.
  3. Standard Sockets. All other sockets are classified as standard sockets.

 

Prevention Techniques

Perform regular visual inspections to identify signs of abnormal wear:

  • Check specifically for discolored, bent or broken pins, and non-uniform locations within the socket housing.
  • If any concerns arise then compare the socket to another socket of the same type (if available) to see if they both have the same characteristics. Differences may point to an area of concern.
  • Actuate/open the socket and check if all parts seem to be moving properly. Make sure there is no unusual friction or noise of parts grinding against each other.
  • Ensure proper mounting of the socket to board interface (i.e. load board).

Determine and minimize outside sources of dust and debris. One method that is helpful here is to examine the composition of any foreign matter that is found in the sockets. This can be a good clue as to where issues are coming from. Also, see the Socket Degradation analysis section below for additional information.

Keep the relative humidity levels as low as possible in the programming facility. When relative humidity levels are high it is easier for contamination to stick to sockets and may be harder for them to be properly cleaned.

Never use bare fingers to reach in or touch any pins or parts inside of the socket nest. Oil and and dermis will contaminate the contacts and cause premature failure.

Do not use unapproved cleaning techniques which could cause damage to any part of the socket. Some cleaners do not work well with plastics that could make up the shell of a socket and others can damage parts of the connecting pins.

Be extra careful when setting up new jobs. Collisions between parts and sockets don't just damage parts, but can also be harmful to sockets.

Do not modify, refinish or re-surface any part of the socket.

 

Causes for Socket Degradation and sequence of steps for resolution

There are 3 primary causes for degraded socket performance.

  1. As sockets are used, solder is transferred from the IC devices to the socket contacts. This solder oxidizes and degrades the electrical signal needed to complete the programming operation.
    1. Compressed air and Nanotek brush used in combination
    2. Cleaning Devices
    3. Chemical or Laser Cleaning
  2. The signal can be further degraded as organic and inorganic debris collects on the contact surfaces. This debris comes from the programming environment as well as from the actual devices being programmed.
    1. Compressed air and soft bristle brush used in combination
    2. Cleaning Devices
    3. Chemical or Laser Cleaning
  3. Mechanical damage to the contact interface. Each time a device is inserted into a socket, a small amount of mechanical wear can occur. This can damage the critical gold plating which is needed to maintain an electrical interconnect.
    1. If the socket is inexpensive then it should be replaced.
    2. If the socket is a pogo pin style socket then possibly the pins themselves can be replaced and replacement parts on the socket refurbished. Contact Support.
    3. Sockets can also be sent to an outside company like Nu Signal. They specialize in cleaning and resurfacing socket pins.

 

Procedures applicable to specific socket categories

Elastomer Sockets
  1. Compressed air. This should be the standard preventative maintenance procedure for this socket type.
  2. Use of 3M Magic Tape (3M model number:3M-MP-18) followed by the compressed air routine.
  3. When yield has become insufficient, contact BPM for replacement socket.
Pogo Pin sockets
  1. All Cleaning methods except 3M Magic Tape and Chemical Bath Cleaning are open for this type socket. Chemical Bath Cleaning is not recommended since chemicals can get inside the housing of a Pogo Pin during the cleaning process but are not easily removed. Once inside the Pin they will cause the pins to work improperly.
  2. When yield has become insufficient, contact BPM for replacement socket, or contact Nu Signal for special cleaning options
  3. Pogo pins have the added advantage of being replaceable. Please contact BPM determine the cost and logistics of replacing pins.
Standard Type Sockets.
  1. All cleaning Methods except 3M Magic Tape are open for Standard Type sockets.
  2. When yield has become insufficient, contact BPM for replacement options.
Compression Mount Sockets
  1. All Elastomer, All Pogo Pin and some Standard sockets will fall into this category.
  2. There is a second connection interface which is between the socket and the PCB. Whenever sockets are mounted to the board it is important to ensure the board is clean and free of contaminants (lubricants, flux, particles). One method is to wipe the socket pads on the board using a soft cotton cleaning tip (or sponge tip). Soak the tip in alcohol or contact cleaner and use gentle pressure. This step should be followed with compressed air to remove any fibers from the pads.
  3. When mounting sockets to the PCB torque specifications must be followed. Contact BPM Tech Support. If incorrect torque is applied on the socket, it may result in poor yields.

 

Socket Cleaning Procedures

Compressed air.

Using a clean dry air source blow compressed air into the socket nest. If possible vary the angle and position of the nozzle tip so that any dust/debris which is inside the socket nest is pushed on from different angles and therefore has the best opportunity to be pushed out of the frame. 

The distance from the tip to the socket is dependant on the amount of air flow though the nozzle but in general the tip should be kept more than 2.54cm (1 inch) away from the socket during this process. Line pressure should not exceed 30 psi. This cleaning technique should be the most regularly applied technique and should be used as a follow up technique after any of the other cleaning technique has been implemented.

Soft Bristle Brush Cleaning

Soft Bristle Brush Cleaning is generally used for helping to remove any dust and debris from inside the socket nest. To do this, gently brush the socket nest from multiple angles to help dislodge any dust or debris.

3M Magic Tape (3M model number:3M-MP-18)

This can be used to remove any dust or dirt that has accumulated on the pad of an elastomer socket. To do this place the magic tape onto the pad and then simply remove it. The idea is that any dust or dirt will remain attached to the tape which can then be discarded. The tape should not be allowed to sit on the surface and should not be pressed into place with a lot of force. Please note, applying too much pressure onto the Elastomer pad can cause damage.This method should be used only after a concern has been identified.

Nanotek Brush Cleaning

Nanotek Brush Cleaning is generally used for helping to remove contamination/build-up on a contact pins that is due to solder migration. To do this, gently brush the socket pins in the socket. Since the brush type is metal, extra care needs to be taken to ensure that damage to the device pins does not occur. The force required for gently cleaning a socket pin is roughly equivalent to the same force used when brushing your teeth. Additional force is not guaranteed to give better cleaning results and as stated earlier could potentially damage device pins.

The Nanotek brush should only be pulled (never pushed) when cleaning. If the brush is pushed then bristles can deform which will reduce the life of the brush. When looking at a brush from the side you will notice a slight angle to the bristles, please be sure to take advantage of this angle when reaching into tight spots so that a direct vertical pushing of the brush into the socket can be avoided.

The Nanotek brush should be mainly used to brush the specific points where the socket makes contact with a device. Other than general cleanliness, cleaning other locations will not effect the contact interface between the socket and device. Once the contact points are determined please brush 10 to 20 times for each point to ensure a through cleaning. In most cases, in order to reach all of the contact points the socket will need to be actuated in the same manner as would be done when manually placing a device into it.

Different size Nanotek brushes are available for use in different applications. In general the below table should be used to determine the best size brush for cleaning different socket types.

Size of Device Programmed by the Socket

Size of Nanotek Brush to use for Cleaning

Size of Device Programmed by the Socket
Size of Nanotek Brush to use for Cleaning
< 5mm x 5mm
1mm
< 10mm x 10mm
2mm
> 10mm x 10mm
3mm

Different Bristle type Nanotek brushes are available for use in different applications. In general, it is recommended that 0.03mm O.D. bristles are used when preventative maintenance is being done and 0.05mm O.D. bristles are used when cleaning sockets for which reduced functionality has already been observed.

Here is a full table of brushes available from BPM Microsystems. These brushes can also be purchased directly from Kita Manufacturing.

Part #
Size of Nanotek Brush
OD of Nanotek Brush Bristles
CNBRUSH-1-003
1mm
0.03mm
CNBRUSH-1-005
1mm
0.05mm
CNBRUSH-2-003
2mm
0.03mm
CNBRUSH-2-005
2mm
0.05mm
CNBRUSH-3-003
3mm
0.03mm
CNBRUSH-3-005
3mm
0.05mm
Cleaning Devices

Cleaning devices can be purchased that are made based on size and shape of the device being programmed by the socket in questions. 

To use these cleaning devices

Actuate the socket in the same manner as would be done to manually place a device into it. Place a Cleaning Device into the socket instead of standard device.

Actuate, remove, and again place the Cleaning Device into the socket for a total of 3 insertions when preventative maintenance is being done or 6 insertions after functionality concerns have already been identified.

Finally, remove the Cleaning Device from the socket.

Cleaning devices are rated to clean sockets for 250 touchdowns after which they should be discarded and a different cleaning device used. Cleaning devices are best used as tools for preventative maintenance.

Chemical Tip Cleaning.

Using a medium to firm non-metal bristle brush and a commercially available cleaning solution clean the contact points of the Device Socket. To do this, wet the brush with the cleaning solution and brush in one direction for several brush strokes. Change the direction several times and use several brush strokes in each direction. Cleaning should be done while the socket is both in the actuated and non-actuated socket positions as different positions will lend themselves to better access depending on the specific socket being cleaned. (See pictures below).

- Do not twist the brush in a circular pattern. 

- Never push on the socket brush during the cleaning process. This greatly lessens the chances of the brush or the socket itself being damaged during cleaning.

- Do not apply excessive force when using the brush. The chemical being applied is expected to do most of the work in cleaning so large amounts of force should not be required.

- Do not apply excessive amounts of cleaning solution to the brush. Please remember that only the contact points need to be cleaned. This warning is especially important for Pogo Pin based sockets for which the cleaning solution should not be allowed to make its way into the pogo pin housing.

 

Approved solutions for bristle brush cleaning are:

- Envi-Ro-Tech 1676, general purpose defluxer, manufactured by Tech Spray, INC., PO. Box 949, Amarillo Texas, 79105

- Isopropyl Alcohol 

Ultrasonic Bath Cleaning.

This method of cleaning has been available for a long time and can be very effective for cases where the socket can be removed from the PCB. The disadvantages are that in general a whole socket will need to be subjected to the cleaning process so the choice of cleaning solution is critical. Never immerse the socket in an untried solution. If a newly available solution is applied to the socket this should be done first using the Chemical Tip Cleaning method so that any damage to socket pins or housing can be observed. 

The standard method for cleaning a socket using an ultrasonic bath is to:

  1. Socket should be removed from the PCB.
  2. Place the Socket into the a small glass container filled with cleaning solution.
  3. Place the small glass container into the ultrasonic bath.
  4. Run the ultrasonic bath at around 25deg C to 40kHz for 60min (unless otherwise specified by cleaning solution chosen).
  5. Remove socket from bath and use compressed air routine to remove as much solution as possible.
  6. Bake socket for 30min at 65deg C to dry up cleaning solution.
  7. Visually inspect that all cleaning solution has evaporated. If not sure, let the socket sit for an additional 30min before returning it to the PCB.
Laser Cleaning

This method is one of the most reliable method for cleaning pins that are having issues. The advantage of laser cleaning is the precision of the cleaning method since only the parts of the socket which need cleaning (the contact pins) are cleaned and there is less chance of damage to other socket components. Another advantage of this method is that Sockets are able to remain on the PCB (as opposed to chemical bath where the sockets should be removed from the PCB). Laser cleaning services are available from outside groups. Alternately laser cleaning machines can be purchased and used in-house if trained personnel are hired to operate such equipment. A quick web search will yield both Laser cleaning service providers as well as laser cleaning machine vendors.

Outside Cleaning Services

Finally there are companies which specialize in cleaning and revitalizing previously used sockets to maximize the socket life. The disadvantage of this is that sockets will need to be shipped off site and there is additional time delay, but the result in time saving and cost effectiveness can easily justify this method.

Summary

Daughter cards (d-cards) cannot normally be repaired for less than the cost of a new d-card, therefore out of warranty d-cards will no longer be repaired. An RMA will not be issued for out of warranty d-cards. 

 

Details

Support will not authorise any daughter card/socket cards for repair, knowing that the issue is the card. In many cases customers already know it is a d-card issue as they have purchased a replacement d-card or used a spare card that works. 

Replacement socket receptacles can be purchased, depending on daughter card type, which typically will resolve most continuity issues.

 

EXCEPTION, warranty items can still be sent in for warranty repair, but the complete socket module needs to be returned as the card must be function tested with the module.

Socket modules that are out of warranty may still be sent in if they have d-cards, but if support has an idea that the root cause is the d-card then the purchase of a new d-card should be made before RMA is issued.

If an RMA is issued, then you should be aware that you will have to pay for labor and maybe purchase a new d-card.

 

BPM provide a variety of different socket modules and daughter cards, from manual opening to automated sprung sockets.

Typically over the life of these modules, contacts can wear out which in turn produces continuity or programming issues because the device is not making sufficient electrical contact with the socket pins.

In most cases, these sockets are soldered to the daughter card or socket module and due to fine pitch and the leads, specialist desoldering tools are required to replace the sockets.

BPM considered this scenario and provide a more cost effective "R" for receptacle and "C" for compression, socket.

Receptacle

These types of sockets allow for the worn socket to be simply lifted off of the module or daughter card so that they can be exchanged for a new socket, as seen in the following picture.

ASMR

 

 

Compression

This type offers the same benefits as Receptacle types, but requires a little more work as they are typically fixed to the PCB using nuts to ensure a secure and tight contact to the contact pads, as seen in the following picture.

ASMC

 

 

Both types provide a much lower support cost over fixed type sockets as the replacement sockets are only a fraction of the cost of a complete module or daughter card.

It is recommended that the insert counts are reset when a socket is changed, to allow tracking of the number of inserts each module or daughter card has processed.

More information of socket part numbering can be found here: http://www.adaptsys.com/support-services/bpm-support/kb/article/bpm-part-number-description-summary

Alternatively, speak with your local sales/service engineer to check availability of receptacle or compression modules or for replacement sockets.

Summary

Sockets and daughter cards are considered consummables and are not warrantied.
BPM Microsystems will warranty the motherboard of the socket module for one year from purchase against defects in workmanship and component failure. This does not include the breaking of the euroconnector rails.

Details

  • Are these socket modules failing diagnostics? 
    If so, we need to obtain the blackbox from when the diagnostics test was completed, so we investigate the cause.
  • What device are being programmed? 
    We need to obtain the full device part number for the components that were being used.
  • If this is a continuity issue, what pin/ball are problematic? 
    Details will be provided in the log view window in BPWin and in the black box file.
  • Have they tried blowing the socket out with dry air or cleaning the socket with an approved electronics cleaner and/or ultrasonic?
    This can help remove any contamination.
  • How many insertions do the sockets have?
    This can be found out by going to Tools > Socket Module counter in BPWin.
    NOTE: Only the site that is configured as the master site will be read when this operation is run.

This information can be provided to us via our helpdesk, so that the item can be returned for investigation.
In the case of a any warranty claim, please provide the invoice number that relates to the original purchase.
BPM Microsystems decision on warranty claims is final.

If properly cared for the socket module base, the part that connects to the programmer, should last for 10's of thousands of cycles, regardless of the package.

It is important the care is taken during installation and removal of the module from the programmer so as not to damage the DIN connectors.
The actual sockets themselves are consumables and thus have a more limited life expectancy.
Insertion cycles in excess of 10,000 cycles on standard pitch sockets is typical if the operator uses care during the insertion of the device to be programmed, especially on automated programmers where correct teaching should be conducted and when proper cleaning practices are used.

BGA, and CSP sockets have typically been found to be less robust than other package types.

Customer feedback regarding the cycle life on BGA sockets indicates 2,500 to 10,000 is typical, again, handling and cleaning practices can affect the number of insertions achieved.